5

In conversation, I just said:

Treib's bloß nicht zu weit, hörst du? Audrey ist auch so schon genug um dich besorgt.

  • Don't take it too far, you hear me? Audrey is worried enough about you (even) as it is without you causing any more trouble.

To express the idea of "enough (...) as it is", I got into the habit of adding "auch" to the phrase "auch so schon genug" without actually understanding its precise function.


This "auch" is, to my mind, placed for further emphasis: "worried enough about you (even) as it is". Perhaps in a similar manner to, say:

I habe den Befehl, niemanden auch nur in ihre Nähe zu lassen. -- {even just/only}


I'm wondering if I'm on the right track in my interpretation. To say the following in German, should I still include "auch" to "auch so schon genug" to make the sentence sound more idiomatic?

  • He's been through enough this year (even) as it is without any added family drama.
6
  • Ich würde da "auch ohnehin schon" sagen, aber eine kleine Recherché in Google ergab, dass du es richtig verwendet hast. Glückwunsch :) NS: du bist wahrscheinlich ja auch ein Muttersprachler... Im Englischen gibt es halt kein vorangestelltes "auch". Das mit dem Befehl würde ich als "not even cloze to her" übersetzen. – Dan Jul 15 '19 at 2:55
  • Sollte es nicht besser "is already worried enough" - already allerdings für "schon", nicht für "auch" - heißen? – user unknown Jul 15 '19 at 7:40
  • Liegt die Betonung hier nicht auf "so"? Das erklärt auch die Übersetzung mit "as it is" besser, dann wäre "auch" das Äquivalent zu "already" – Sentry Jul 15 '19 at 9:09
  • die ganze woche bleiben, oder auch nur das Wochenende; niemanden an Sie heran, auch nur in Ihre Nähe zu lassen. Somehow I feel there is missing a gar and a je/ja. jedoch ~/~ jeauch? Naja, Antworten hast du ja auch so ohne mein Zutun schon schön früh erhalten. – vectory Jul 15 '19 at 17:51
  • Ich will's jezuwahr nicht gar zu weit treiben, aber vergleiche doch einmal so mit Lat. se "without", and so-ohne mit Lat. sine, Fr. sans; En. sole "alone, lonely". so lonely :'/ – vectory Jul 15 '19 at 17:56
1

I'm wondering if I'm on the right track in my interpretation. To say the following in German, should I still include "auch" to "auch so schon genug" to make the sentence sound more idiomatic?

No, the sentence will not sound any more idiomatic if you add "auch (so)". The adverb just puts more emphasis on it as you already mentioned correctly.

Er hat dieses Jahr schon genug durchgemacht.

Er hat dieses Jahr auch so schon genug durchgemacht.

0

(a) Treibs bloß nicht zu weit, hörst du? Audrey ist schon genug um dich besorgt.

(b) Treibs bloß nicht zu weit, hörst du? Audrey ist so schon genug um dich besorgt.

(c) Treibs bloß nicht zu weit, hörst du? Audrey ist auch so schon genug um dich besorgt.

All options mean the same and reflect the »enough as it is« sufficiently. The emphasis added by (b) and (c) is small.

The second »auch« makes only sense with the following »nur«, omitting one of the two would change the message. Contrary to the upper »auch nur« adds a strong emphasis; your example sentence is a »shorty« of e. g.

  • Ich habe den Befehl, niemanden auch nur in ihre Nähe zu lassen, geschweige denn ganz an sie heran.
  • Ich habe den Befehl, niemanden auch nur in ihre Nähe zu lassen, geschweige denn, dass ihr jemand ein Geschenk überreicht.
0

It is a rather transparent combination of

reicht so // as is, like that

reicht auch // too, also

reicht schon // yet, already, well

PS: indeed, as another answer says, auch is not strictly needed. However auch schon is an idiomatic collocation. If some kid says "Das habe ich schon", the eager friend will respond "Ich auch schon"; Or maybe ich auch, which would appear like an ellipsis (nevermind the lack of an inflected verb in either case).

But the so is more interesting, as Latin se, "without" compares well. Therefore, "Spass hast du so schon, deshalb brauchst du keine Rollschuhe" may have a very different meaning than the other so's; There are so many of them, so that I have to reason further like so: A relation to sole "alone, without" is obvious, and a relation to in this one way and no other is thinkable.

The importance of auch in this collocation, might be the contrast, "you won't get it this way and not that way". Indeed, the Dutch cognate ook means "and".

It would be skimpy to say that auch had just creeped into this phrase by accident, that it was used in redundancy for good measure. We do call phrases fossilized, if the words are not used productively anymore (ie. what is lieren in verlieren, forelorn? Or verletzen and what does it have to do with lust?). Since many senses of auch are used productively, it would be a stretch to call this phrase a fossil, but the gist is that children simply copy the language and rationalize it as they go. What anyone thinks when they say it is of little concern so far, because there may not be one unique answer. So I hold etymology as an important part of interpretation. Although, its etymology eludes me so far. I mean it is well enough a rather volatile idiom, too, like many other conjunctions (cp. Greek O kei; Ger oder auch?).

schon appears like an amalgam of schön and En soon, maybe with a hint of shunt, i.e. "close* ... or rather meaning early, morning following a complicated argument I already forgot.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.