4

I'm interested in phrases such as

  1. From 2002 till my pension in October 2016 I worked at the company X1 as Y1.

and

  1. From 2017 till now I am working at the company X2 as Y2.

I'm interested in the correct translation of "From ... till ...".

Concerning 1, is it "Seit 2002 bis zum Renteneintritt in Oktober 2016 ..." or "Von 2002 bis zum Renteneintritt in Oktober 2016 ..."? Concerning 2, is it "Seit September 2017 bis jetzt...". Or is it something else?

5

For 1
It is (almost) your second guess:

Von 2002 bis zum Renteneintritt im Oktober 2016

Note that it is im Oktober, not in.

For 2
It is either

Seit September 2017

The "seit" already automatically includes the information that it is still lasting. Alternatively you can say

Von September 2017 bis jetzt

The former version is preferrable.

4

Von, seit and ab can be used to denote the beginning of something.

The Duden on von:

  1. gibt einen zeitlichen Ausgangspunkt an

The Duden on seit:

gibt den Zeitpunkt an, zu dem ein bestimmter Zustand, Vorgang eingetreten ist

The Duden on ab:

  1. von … an

If you want to tell when it ended, you would usually use von with bis (Von Montag bis Freitag.). Seit is used when it's open ended and you maybe want to emphasize when it began. However, if it's open ended, you could also use von (Von da an fragte ich regelmäßig auf German Stack Exchange.). You can also change the above example to include ab (Ab da fragte ich regelmäßig auf German Stack Exchange.)

From 2002 till my pension in October 2016 I worked at the company X1 as Y1.

Von 2002 bis zu meinem Renteneintritt / Pensionierung im Oktober 2016 ...

From 2017 till now I am working at the company X2 as Y2.

Von 2017 bis jetzt ...

Again, with bis, von sounds more natural. However, saying

Seit 2017 arbeite ich ...

conveys the same meaning here.

2

As a native german-speaker, I can't see a problem with your first translation. However, I wouldn't use "Seit" together with "Bis". I'm only a native speaker, not a professional, so I don't know if this is really gramatically wrong, but I'd recommend using "Von" in both cases.

  • Welcome on the site! Don't worry, native speaker posts are very worthy. Everybody can check the translation of a word anywhere, but questions like how does it sound, no one can answer that, only you. – peterh Jul 18 at 18:18

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