1

In conversation, I was talking about:

  1. After working on night shifts for a week straight, I've just now seen the sun for the first time in a week -- with the period of not seeing the sun now being over.

To express this idea, I said:

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen hatte, wie schön sie ist.

But then, how should I paraphrase this "Es ist so lange her" sentence if what I want to say is:

  1. I've been working on night shifts, and I haven't seen the sun for a week now -- with the period of not seeing the sun still being ongoing.

In French, this nuance can be expressed with some changes in tense:

{for the 1st idea}: Ça faisait longtemps que je n’avais pas vu le soleil, j’avais presque oublié à quel point c’était beau.

{for the 2nd idea}: Ça fait longtemps que je n’ai pas vu le soleil.

2

If you just want to focus on it grammatically, the time of the object clause is decisive:

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen hatte, wie schön sie ist.

This is plusperfect and indicates something else has happened in-between as opposed to using perfect:

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen habe, wie schön sie ist.

The thing happening in-between would presumably be you seeing the sun.

However, this is a very subtle difference and normally the context should make clear which of both you mean. Otherwise, paraphrasing like in inifinitrzero’s answer should do it.

1

Case 1:

Ich hatte die Sonne schon so lange nicht mehr gesehen, dass ich beinahe vergessen hatte, wie schön sie ist.

Case 2:

Ich habe die Sonne schon so lange nicht mehr gesehen, dass ich gar nicht mehr weiß, wie sie aussieht. (Or: wie schön sie in Wirklichkeit ist/...)

0

An ongoing time interval can be expressed with seit:

Ich habe die Sonne (schon) seit einer Woche nicht (mehr) gesehen. I haven't seen the sun for a week

The brackets are independet of each other and can be used to add more emphasis.

Likewise:

Ich habe die Sonne (schon) seit Langem nicht (mehr) gesehen. I haven't since the sun for a long time

0

Ich meine die Prämisse ist nicht ganz in Ordnung:

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen hatte, wie schön sie ist.

Man kann einen Vorgang, der in der Vergangenheit geendet hat sprachlich gut abgrenzen von einem, der im Moment endet. Im ersteren Fall müsste es dann aber "war so lange her" heißen:

Es war so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen hatte, wie schön sie ist.

Im Zweiten, da man die Sonne gerade das erste Mal wieder sieht, "vergessen habe":

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich beinahe vergessen habe, wie schön sie ist.

Wenn die Dauer des Nichtsehens anhält, ist noch offen, ob man vergessen wird, wie schön sie ist; die Zukunft wird es zeigen.

Es ist so lange her, dass ich die Sonne gesehen habe, dass ich noch vergessen werde, wie schön sie ist.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.