5

The following sentence occurs in Slow German Podcast #185:

Dann bekam er die Chance mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Süd- und Mittelamerika zu reisen.

I am wondering if the following rearrangement is equally correct German and with the same translation:

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen, zusammen mit einem Botaniker für 5 Jahre durch Süd- und Mittelamerika.

I have seen it suggested that it is good style to keep the parts of the verbs as close together as possible. Opinions?

  • 1
    You should do it if you have a prepositional group or präfixverb + infinitiv mit zu. Your second example is possible, but rather in informal spoken speech. – Dan Sep 18 at 22:55
1

The first thing to note is that the sentence in question contains a non-finite clause.

mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen

As a clause, it occurs uninterrupted in a sentence as a subject, object or attributive clause.

Mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen, war eine einmalige Chance.

Mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen, hielt er für eine einmalige Chance.

die Chance, mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen

In the first two examples, I have placed the non-finite clause in first position (Vorfeld in the theory of topological fields). The most popular place to put subordinate clauses, however, is the Nachfeld, i.e. after non-finite verbs in the main clause. The beginning of the Nachfeld is invisible in the original example, as there is no non-finite verb. However, the structure is easily made visible by adding a verb, for instance by replacing the preterite with the perfect. In written language, the comma helps as well.

Dann hat er die Chance bekommen, mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen.

Note that the non-finite clause is attributive; it belongs to and modifies Chance.

Moving something into the Nachfeld is known as Ausklammerung. In writing, postponing non-clausal elements, like mit seinen Vorschlägen in the following example, is not always well-received, although it often occurs in spoken language.

Er hat mich heute wieder mit seinen Vorschlägen genervt.

Er hat mich heute wieder genervt mit seinen Vorschlägen.

Your modified example looks like a failed attempt at Ausklammerung.

Dann hat er die Chance bekommen, mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Südamerika zu reisen 1) mit einem Botaniker zusammen 2) fünf Jahre lang 3) durch Südamerika.

Note that we have three elements being postponed at once, and that there is no obvious reason for postponing them. The elements being postponed belong to a non-finite clause that is itself postponed. Contrast this with an acceptable example.

Dann ist er mit einer Botanikerin, die er im Studium kennengelernt hat, nach Südamerika gereist.

Dann ist er nach Südamerika gereist mit einer Botanikerin, die er im Studium kennengelernt hat.

Here we have a reason for postponing: Putting the marked phrase into the Nachfeld keeps ist … gereist closer together and makes processing the sentence easier.

12

The idea of keeping the finite verb and participles/infinitives together does not apply here, as the infinitive clause does not belong closely to the finite verb. It's an object.

Dann bekam er die Chance, mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Süd- und Mittelamerika zu reisen.

This is how you should write. Or speak. This is sound.

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen, zusammen mit einem Botaniker für 5 Jahre durch Süd- und Mittelamerika.

This shortens the whole infinitive clause to the infinitive expression zu reisen, and then adds the leftovers as a free adverbial. People sometimes speak that way if they forgot crucial information. Don't do it by purpose. Don't write like this. It sounds hasty, telegram-alike.

  • Yeah, so etwa wie "weil ich es nicht mehr weiß jetzt". – Dan Sep 18 at 22:57
5

Completely agree with Janka's answer. However, let me add one thought.

German often produces long sentences that you need to parse to the very end to find the verb and understand what the sentence is all about:

Dann bekam er die Chance [long insertion with lots of details] zu reisen.

Non-native speakers often seem to feel the urge to move the important verb part ("zu reisen") somewhere to the front, to get the meaning across faster. There are some "disruptive" means for that, but they tend to divert towards shopping list style:

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen - und zwar zusammen mit einem Botaniker für 5 Jahre durch Süd- und Mittelamerika.

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen, nämlich zusammen mit einem Botaniker für 5 Jahre durch Süd- und Mittelamerika.

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen: zusammen mit einem Botaniker, für 5 Jahre, durch Süd- und Mittelamerika.

Good style can be kept up by turning the single sentence into multiple ones:

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen. Zusammen mit einem Botaniker verbrachte er 5 Jahre in Süd- und Mittelamerika.

  • Sehr hilfsreicher Einfall, danke! – Dan Sep 19 at 18:43
1

Just to add to the answers already present, as Janka already wrote but didn't explicitly mention, there should be a comma after Chance.

Dann bekam er die Chance, mit einem Botaniker zusammen fünf Jahre lang durch Süd- und Mittelamerika zu reisen.

There is not need to keep the parts of the verbs close together, because "bekam" and "zu reisen" are not parts of one verb, they are two different verbs. "Er bekam die Chance" is a valid sentence, and as long as you can infer from the context what "Chance" means, the meaning is clear. In this case, "Chance" is explained by the part after the comma.

The second example is at least not good style. If it were just the following part without the rest of the sentence, then it would be no problem, but the meaning would be different: "He was offered the opportunity, and someone else was also offered the same opportunity."

Dann bekam er die Chance zu reisen, zusammen mit einem Botaniker.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy