1

In the Langenscheidt I found this expression:

unter Stress stehen (1.)

Then I consulted also the Duden:

im S. sein; im/unter S. stehen (2.)

where S. stands for stress.

In other words, as far as the context of Stress is concerned, one can use the prepositions in and unter with stehen, but not with sein. More simply put, I cannot say: unter Stress sein. Why not? Why does it work only with stehen? What are the subtle differences in imagery (which I am not catching) that these two verbs evoke, such that unter is possible with the first, but not with the latter?

0

Unter Stress stehen is a collocation. You can replace Stress with a handful of semantically similar words, like Spannung, Strom, Druck, or remote words like Arrest, Schutz, Beobachtung, Narkose, …. Only with Stress, you have the equivalent option of in/im … sein.

As for imagery, which I do think is a great way to remember: Imagine your boss as a giant. He/she is treading on you. You're standing straight, raising your arms and bracing your body, struggling to not succumb under his/her sole.

  • 1
    Verstehe ich Dich richtig, dass man "Er ist in Schutz/Arrest/Narkose" nicht sagen kann? – user unknown Jan 5 at 11:46
  • @user Er ist in/im Stress hört sich für mich ebenso nicht ungewöhnlich an. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 5 at 12:16
  • @πάν: Willst Du damit sagen, dass Du das aus meiner Aussage schließt? Dem zweiten Absatz Cacambos kann ich übrigens nicht zustimmen; ich betrachte das "im Stress stehen" nicht als Hinweis auf eine widerständige Haltung, wobei ich mich gemütlich auf "unter Narkose stehen" berufen würde. – user unknown Jan 5 at 12:44
  • @us Ich will damit sagen, dass unter im Kontext von Stress nicht zwingend notwendig ist. Unter Narkose stehen, kann dagegen wohl kaum mit in Narkose stehen ersetzt werden, da hast Du recht. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 5 at 12:48
  • @userunknown "Er ist in/im Schutz/Arrest/Narkose" kann man nicht sagen, ja. Jedenfalls würde ich nicht das Gleiche verstehen wie unter XYZ stehen, – Cacambo Jan 5 at 14:12
0

Both forms are correct and used in standard German:

"Ich bin unter Stress." is the same as "Ich stehe unter Stress."

You can use the forms synonymously.

The form "unter Stress stehen" is, maybe, a little more elegant.

  • 1
    I never heard "Ich bin unter Stress" - except in a construction like Ich bin unter Stress leicht reizbar (=Ich bin leicht reizbar, wenn ich unter Stress stehe) – Volker Landgraf Jan 5 at 20:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.