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Guten Morgen liebe Marie.

Is it affectionate, flirtatious, or just a greeting you would send to any friend? The example is coming from a guy.

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    You can translate it with "dear" like in an English letter "Dear Marie". – Nick Jan 14 at 17:07
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Guten Morgen liebe Marie.

Is it affectionate, flirtatious, or just a greeting you would send to any friend?

Well, affectionate in the sense of cordial yes.
Flirtatious usually not, at least not in a context used at work or for a friend1.

It can be used for any colleague or friend.

If used in a romantic relationship, it would rather be

Guten Morgen meine liebe Marie.


1)Though in those contexts it's also not that common. I'd be prepared, that some hammer thing I broke, or bad news might be stated after, and it was just a phrase to attenuate what's said next.

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    In a romantic context, you could also say Guten Morgen liebste Marie. – Volker Landgraf Jan 15 at 16:52
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Guten Morgen liebe Marie. Is it affectionate, flirtatious, or just a greeting you would send to any friend? The example is coming from a guy.

As far as my experience goes this can mean all your listed intentions. Thus it completely depends on the persons communicating and the context.

  • some people use it all the day to anyone
  • some people use it to anyone they call by first name
  • some people use it only to people they consider "(close) friends"
  • some people use it only to people they are in or assume a "romantic" relationship
  • some people use it only in reply after gotten addressed that way

That said, I would assume the person using that phrase somehow emotionally bonds with Marie/ "the other one" thus the intention is unclear from the sentence alone.

Why not a clear "romantic relationship"? Because some people don't use that phrase at all. => there is no 100 % boundary when "romance" begins.

Why not a clear "never on workplace"? Because some people use it on anyone they talk to personally. few months ago came across some twitter accounts talking about using "liebe/r" that way

I used and received the term "liebste Marie" also while speaking to a friend to "simulate" puppy dog eyes to ask for a favour - and these puppy dog eyes where obviously meant ironically.

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