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What does this word, and this use of 'Tatsache' mean?

Example:

Am Ende der Rutschbahn in den Abgrund wartet der feste Boden der Theatertatsachen, markiert durch ein Dutzend Äxte.

Source.

  • Welcome to German.SE. As you figured out already the determiner and the primary word, you might have also came upon the idea of starting a translation from end to start? For this word: first getting the idea behind Tatsache(n), then trying to narrow it down with Theater. In current case it seems far from obvious, maybe later this "trick" is useful. The leftover problem stays untouched: get to know where to split a long word into useful parts. – Shegit Brahm Feb 21 at 23:05
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This is a word play on the phrase:

Auf den Boden der Tatsachen zurückgeholt werden

Ignoring the extra words, the sentence would read as

Am Ende der Rutschbahn in den Abgrund wartet der Boden der Tatsachen, markiert durch ein Dutzend Äxte.

Thinking about it, it is an even more fantastic pun. I'm not sure if it was intended by the author, but I couldn't let it go (read this with a wink): A Tatsache is generally translated as fact. But you can get a different meaning if you split up the word into Tat, an act or a crime and Sache which is a thing. Reading it like this, the word becomes "crime thing", which an axe can be (thinking of murder weapon). Also, often the adjective "hart" is used (harter Boden der Tatsachen), to really emphasize you get knocked back to earth. In this case, fest works as well.

So all in all, the fantastic ride on the slide is percipitously interrupted by theatre props - namely axes.

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    Whoever voted (-1), would you care to explain so I can improve on this answer? – infinitezero Feb 21 at 20:01
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    I agree with the first part, but I think you are reading to much into it. But who knows, as it's the feuilleton ^^. – mtwde Feb 21 at 20:36
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    Hm, I agree, it might not have been intentional (added this to the post), however I can't unsee it now :D – infinitezero Feb 21 at 20:39
  • The downvote is mine out of two reasons. 1) There is no word play in the context. 2) The explanation of "Tatsache" is fully OT, aber so was von! – Nico Feb 21 at 20:52
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    Edited to make it clearer. – infinitezero Feb 21 at 21:10

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