0

This sentence appears in Chap 22 of Donna Leon's Acqua Alta:

Er wandte den Blick von der Schale und sah Brett an, versuchte seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und ihr verständlich zu machen.

Now, there are 2 people referred to in this sentence, a man and Brett (a woman, BTW). One of these two, in the second part of the sentence, is trying to empathize with the man's indignation and to make it understandable. But I cannot tell who is doing this, which of the two, from the sentence.

The story would be most consistent with Brett, and admittedly, it would be odd for someone to have to try to empathize with his own indignation and make it understandable. That would be the job of another person. But how can the subject of this part be left completely implied? Is it to be expected that German authors may arbitrarily leave out naming a subject they believe should be understood?

If the grammar is accepted as written, the sentence does not appear to make any sense, not from the story line, but more specifically, not from the definition of "nachempfinden" in Duden:

sich so in einen anderen Menschen hineinversetzen, dass man das Gleiche empfindet wie er; etwas, was ein anderer empfindet, in gleicher Weise empfinden (und darum verstehen).

Duden makes it clear that the word requires "einen anderen Menschen", so the man cannot be trying to put himself in his own shoes in order to feel his indignation the same as he feels it himself.

I think it has to be concluded that this sentence has an error. The second part should have specified Brett as the subject, or another word other than "nachempfinden" should have been used.

  • So oft, wie wir hier Fragen zu Donna Leon beantworten müssen, sollte man von deren Schriften vielleicht abraten. ;) – user unknown Aug 10 at 0:31
0

Er wandte den Blick von der Schale und sah Brett an, versuchte seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und ihr verständlich zu machen.

Es kann nur er sein, der versucht seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und ihr verständlich zu machen.

Versuchte sie seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden (das würde voraussetzen, dass sie diese schon einmal nachempfunden hat) müsste es lauten:

Er wandte den Blick von der Schale und sah Brett an, die versuchte, seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden

aber dann hinge das

und ihr verständlich zu machen.

unsinnig am Satzende.

Weder sie, noch er werden der Schale oder der Empfindung (ihr) etwas verständlich machen wollen - außer einer von beiden wäre auf einem LSD-Trip, dann vielleicht. Aber das hättest Du uns gesagt.

Nachempfinden wird in der Tat häufig benutzt, wenn man sich in eine andere Person versetzt, aber auch, wenn man sich in der Zeit zurückversetzt. Das noch einmal unterstreicht, dass er die Empfindung schon einmal hatte. Ohne dieses noch einmal würde man leicht ins Schlingern geraten, wieso er seine eigene Empörung nachempfindet. Offenbar ist sie inzwischen verflogen.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you. I am persuaded to understand it as instructed. I do think the sentence is badly written, tho, particularly because of the confusing use of the word nachempfinden. – user44591 Aug 10 at 16:22
6

Grammatically it is unambiguous that "Er" is the subject of every part of the sentence.

So the second part of the sentence, after the comma, means that it's him who has to recap his feelings to be able to convey them to her.

"Brett" is an akkusativ object in the first part of the sentence, so she cannot become the subject of the second part without an additional pronoun.

If Brett was to become the subject of the second part, it would have to be something like this:

Er wandte den Blick von der Schale und sah Brett an, sie versuchte seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und sich verständlich zu machen.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for confirming how I thought it should be read. – user44591 Aug 9 at 7:27
  • Sorry, I don't agree with the second part of the question that you have edited in. I don't think it's an error, Danna Leon really wants to say that "he" has to recap his feelings to be able to convey them to Brett. I agree that "Nachempfinden" is used in quite an unusual way here though. – HalvarF Aug 9 at 7:48
  • 1
    Es würde heißen "… und sah Brett an, die veruschte, seine Empörung … nachzuempfinden…", nicht sie. – user unknown Aug 10 at 0:10
  • @user unknown: das kommt darauf an, ob man einen Relativsatz oder einen neuen Teilsatz bilden möchte. – HalvarF Aug 10 at 7:04
  • 1
    @HalvarF: Müsste dann aber nicht ein Punkt oder ein Semikolon vor dem "sie" stehen? – user unknown Aug 11 at 0:16
1

Er ... versuchte seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und ihr verständlich zu machen.

It's him trying to re-feel his indignation. He is trying to drill down on this feeling to have it clear for himself.

Er ... versuchte seine Empörung noch einmal nachzuempfinden und ihr verständlich zu machen.

When it's clear for him, it might be easier to make her understand his indignation.

| improve this answer | |
  • No, I think the "ihr" in ihr verständlich zu machen is referring to the seine Empörung, and not to Brett. He could be, "trying to make her understand" (no object), or she could be, "trying to understand his indignation" (with an object). But the "und ihr verständlich zu machen" does not have enough words to account for both a direct and an indirect object in the sense you suggest, "to make her understand his indignation." – user44591 Aug 9 at 14:24
  • 2
    You're wrong. ... seine Empörung ... ihr verständlich zu machen. ihr is dative not accusative. – Olafant Aug 9 at 20:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.