2

I was writing an email in German;

Ich habe für meine Klausur, die voraussichtlich ca. 60 Studentinnen und Studenten schreiben werden, zwei Räume gebucht.

I always use an automatic translation to check whether my sentence makes sense. After translating this sentence to English and then back to German, it becomes;

Ich habe zwei Räume für meine Prüfung gebucht, die voraussichtlich von etwa 60 Studenten geschrieben wird.

My question here is not about passive and active forms but rather whether the description of the object should be in the middle of the main clause as I did or after it?

  1. Ich habe für meine Klausur, die voraussichtlich ca. 60 Studentinnen und Studenten schreiben werden, zwei Räume gebucht.
  1. Ich habe für meine Klausur zwei Räume gebucht, die voraussichtlich ca. 60 Studentinnen und Studenten schreiben werden.
1
  • 1
    Beide Satzstellungen klingen etwas ungewöhnlich. Man könnte auch übersetzen: „Für meine Klausur, die voraussichtlich etwa 60 Student*innen schreiben werden, habe ich zwei Räume gebucht.“ Die Wiederaufnahme, also die Frage, worauf sich „die“ bezieht, ist so leichter. Oct 6 '20 at 18:34
4

Word and sentence order is relatively flexible in German, but some rules need to be obeyed - In your case, it's the relationship between relative clause and associated substantive.

Generally, the relative clause should be positioned directly after the related noun in the sentence. Your example #2 breaks this rule. (Note the sentence #2 would be unclear in English as well. It's clear from the context the students will write the exam and not the rooms, but it still makes you trip up when reading the sentence.)

That's the grammatical issue with the sentence. Then, there are stylistic rules advising you to avoid large parts of the sentence going between subject and object(s) (the brain tends to loose track of where we are, so your very first example somewhat breaks this [soft] rule). Thus

Ich habe zwei Räume für meine Prüfung gebucht, die voraussichtlich von etwa 60 Studenten geschrieben wird.

is probably the best way to express the matter.

3

Extraposition (distancing a dependent clause from its referent word) is perfectly acceptable with relative clauses.

The underlying reason why we recommend keeping related items together is short-term memory. All other things equal, it is easier to understand that "die" refers to "Klausur" if it follows sooner rather than later. However, in your case there is also the pair "habe" + "gebucht". Decreasing the distance between this pair increases the distance between the other, and vice versa. Thus there is a trade-off between following one principle and another very similar one.

Now, German split verbs are used to being far from each other and in general, they can deal with a lot of complements intervening between them. An entire relative clause is a boundary case; the full verb often degenerates to a short remote appendix that seems a bit lonely, almost to the point that I'd prefer version 2.

(A good indicator that the two principles are both of similar strength is that in informal speech, people often invert the sentence to

Ich habe zwei Räume gebucht für meine Klausur, die voraussichtlich ca. 60 Studentinnen und Studenten schreiben werden.

even though this contradicts another, theoretically even stronger principle that complements should not follow the split verb at all.)

2
  • On acceptability of extraposition - opinions seem to differ:: Meine häufige Anwesenheit auf den Brücken hat einen ganz unschuldigen Grund. Dort gibt es den nötigen Raum. Dort kann man einen edlen, langen, deutschen Satz ausdehnen, die Brückengeländer entlang, und seinen ganzen Inhalt mit einem Blick übersehen. Auf das eine Ende des Geländers klebe ich das erste Glied eines trennbaren Zeitwortes und das Schlußglied klebe ich an's andere Ende - dann breite ich den Leib des Satzes dazwischen aus. Gewöhnlich sind für meinen Zweck die Brücken der Stadt lang genug.
    – tofro
    Oct 6 '20 at 9:47
  • If you nest clauses too deeply, at some point it becomes difficult to complete the clauses correctly. An example of such a sentence: Bedenken Sie, wie schön der Bote, der die Nachricht, die den Sieg, den die Athener, obwohl sie in der Unterzahl waren, errungen hatten, verkündete, überbrachte, starb!
    – RHa
    Oct 6 '20 at 12:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.