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I have heard the following sentence in the TV series "How to Sell Drugs Online (Fast)":

Ab damit

Context: two friends have set up an online drug shop and have just sent the first orders by mail. Then one of them says the sentence above.

What does the quoted sentence mean? I know that "damit" means "with it", but I cannot understand what it refers to. "ab" obviously does not mean "from" in this context, so I don't know what it means either.

  • Ab dafür! also exists, in the meaning Off we go. Other uses: Ton ab! (Sound!) and numerous verbs that break into two words Hau ab! (abhauen: Get lost!), Pfeif ab! (abpfeifen, End the game!)... – AmigoJack Oct 14 at 21:55
  • @AmigoJack In which context "sound!" is used? – Alan Evangelista Oct 15 at 1:28
  • On a filming set/as a stage direction, i.e.: Ton ab. Kamera läuft. Example – AmigoJack Oct 15 at 5:42
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Translate as

off you go

or

off it goes

and you have caught most of the gist of this expression, even relatively literal.

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    I can agree on 'off you go', but not 'off you go'. The German expression 'ab damit' can only refer to a thing and not to a person, especially not the person you are talking to ('you'). A German variety of 'off you go' would be 'ab mit dir'. – jarnbjo Oct 7 at 11:26
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    @jambjo I'm lost. I find myself talking to things quite often. I'm sure that doesn't say anything about my mental sanity (I would, however, probably start to question my mental sanity if the things were answering...) – tofro Oct 7 at 15:29
  • I ment to say that I can agree with 'off it goes', but not 'off you go'. – jarnbjo Oct 7 at 16:28

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