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I have heard the following sentence in the TV series "How to Sell Drugs Online (Fast)":

Das hat er dir geglaubt?

Does that mean "Did he believe that (which you said)?" / "Did he believe you (when you said that)" ? In English, "to believe" can only have one direct object (a person or a thing), so it's odd for me to see both a direct object and an indirect object with the German verb "glauben".

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    As you explain, it’s a combination of both. What’s your question?
    – Carsten S
    Nov 18 '20 at 8:33
  • @CarstenS If you read carefully my question, you'll see I haven't explained it. I have guessed it and was asking for confirmation. Nov 18 '20 at 19:00
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That is exactly the right translation. As you realized there are two different objects with believing:

Believe somebody (takes dative case in German)

And

Believe something (takes accusative case in German)

In German it is totally valid to use both at the same time and as you see above they even take different cases. But the sentence contains an additional „hidden“ meaning: there is a special emphasis on the beginning of the sentence: „das“.

It contains a good part of astonishment and transports something along the line of:

Did he really believe that story although it is [so obviously wrong, so implausible, such an obvious lie... choose one]

So the guy who asks thought that the other guy would never believe this, but he did...

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    Maybe it should be mentioned that "somebody" in this context takes the dative case and "something" the accusative. Thus "Sie glaubt ihm jedes Wort." Nov 18 '20 at 5:23
  • Added the cases and one explanatory sentence. Ok like that? Nov 18 '20 at 8:22
  • So confusing for an english speaker. So does this mean this question with believe is really asking two questions at the same time ?
    – John Lamb
    Nov 18 '20 at 12:01
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    Yes, the question "Das hat er Dir geglaubt" can only be translated in two questions or one much longer question in English: He really believed you? and He really believed that thing? Nov 18 '20 at 12:03
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    @Sentry same here, I would have sworn that goes :) Nov 18 '20 at 15:55

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