6

Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller Geheimnisse.

If I were to add an adjective to "Geheimnisse", which case would it take?

Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller gruseligen Geheimnisse.

Is "gruseligen" correct?

8
  • 1
    No. Voller gruseliger. – Harald Lichtenstein Dec 5 '20 at 21:57
  • Why? Which case is this? – Mario Bedoun Dec 5 '20 at 22:01
  • 2
    Your guess in the question headline is right: Genitiv – Harald Lichtenstein Dec 5 '20 at 22:04
  • Ok. Thank you!! – Mario Bedoun Dec 5 '20 at 22:07
  • 3
    @HaraldLichtenstein, please don’t answer in comments. Also, I think that your suggestion is wrong or at least poor style. – Carsten S Dec 6 '20 at 0:45
2

(Literary examples are from the DWDS corpus).

Regular construction: genitive

In general, noun phrases in the genitive can modify other nouns. As feminine and plural nouns have no distinct genitive suffix, case is shown solely by -er on the adjective. The following examples use compound adjectives with -voll in order to exclude any special properties of voll(er).

»Aus dem Kabinett Ihrer Majestät der Kaiserin,« sagte er mit der Miene ehrfurchtsvoller Devotion.

In ihr aber wuchs das Gefühl ahnungsvoller Beklommenheit, das sie gleich beim Betreten des kleinen Gemaches empfunden.

Vielleicht zitterte auf dem Bilde unserer Zärtlichkeit mehr als ein Blick schmerzvoller Entsagung oder wehmütiger Eifersucht.

The general rule for adjectives modifying the same noun is that they bear the same ending. Examples with voller and a feminine or plural noun similar to the example given in the question:

wir leben in einer Zeit voller ängstlicher Fragen

Ein so junger Mensch zieht sich fünf Jahre in ein Haus voller alter Sirenen zurück!

Ich sah das vieltausendköpfige Publikum, ein unruhiges Meer voller bösartiger Fratzen.

Irregular construction: preposition

The current revision of the Duden grammar (paragraph 917) as well as the Duden dictionary count voll(er) among prepositions with genitive or dative.

The reason becomes clear when looking at examples with masculine and neuter (singular) nouns: With voller, the noun has no genitive singular suffix -s. Also note that the genitive singular masculine and neuter form of the adjective voll would be vollen. So the following examples can be considered to show the preposition voller combined with a dative (or at least non-genitive) form of the noun:

Die Wirtin wirft voller Zorn die leere Schachtel auf den Tisch.

das Leben ist voller Risiko

Two examples with an added adjective showing the strong dative suffix -em.

ein Buch voller schwarzem Humor (Duden)

Ich bin Big Mind, Big Heart: vollständig entspannt, voller Gelassenheit, voller Freude, voller innerem Frieden. (Google Books)

Substituting noun phrases in the genitive in the examples above is impossible.

*Die Wirtin wirft vollen Zorns die leere Schachtel auf den Tisch.
*das Leben ist vollen Risikos
*ein Buch vollen schwarzen Humors
*ich bin vollen inneren Friedens

Given example

Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller gruseliger Geheimnisse.

With Geheimnisse being plural, there is no syntactic impediment to interpreting voller as an adjective in the genitive and -er is the only option.

This points to a problem with the Duden analysis: If voller was a completely regular preposition similar to trotz and the like, the following should be okay:

*Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller gruseligen Geheimnissen.

Therefore, voll(er) definitely has idiosyncratic properties that are not accounted for by simply listing it among prepositions such as trotz.

Finally, it would be remiss not to point out that there are also semantic reasons for distinguishing several kinds of voll(er).

die volle Wut = die ganze Wut

voller Wut = voll von, erfüllt von Wut

The simplest view would be to say that the first example has the adjective and the second one the preposition.

3
  • Martin Durrell's book "Hammer's German Grammar and Usage" (academia.edu/27664766/…) has a helpful description for English speakers of adjectives that govern various cases, including the uses of "voll" and "voller". See section 6.5.3(b) of Hammer. – user02814 Dec 7 '20 at 0:34
  • 1
    @user02814 Although voll is of course historically an adjective, listing voll(er) among adjectives is a bit weird: complements of adjectives usually appear on the left of the adjective seiner Sache sicher, des Problems bewusst etc., whereas voll(er) can only have them on the right. That is probably one of the reasons why Duden counts it as a preposition. In the end, the word has idiosyncratic properties that cannot be explained by assigning it to any part of speech. – David Vogt Dec 7 '20 at 18:01
  • Thanks for the additional explanation in the comment. – user02814 Dec 8 '20 at 3:48
0

It's complicated and weird.

First of all: The correct form for "gruselig" in your sentence must be "gruseliger":

Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller gruseliger Geheimnisse.

What I found out about the case, is this:
When the noun is in plural, it seems to be in genitive case. But when you use a noun in singular, it seems to be dative case.
This is very weird, I never before have seen something before.


Here are the details:

Let's begin with some examples (including your sentence):

  • plural

    Der Korb war voller Äpfel.
    Das ist eine Gesellschaft voller gruseliger Geheimnisse.

  • singular

    Das Volk sang voller Glauben in der Messe mit.
    Seine Geschichten sind voller schwarzem Humor.

Now, let's decline these words and phrases:

  • Äpfel
    1. Nom.: Die Äpfel sind rot. -- MATCH
    2. Gen.: Er beraubte uns der Äpfel. -- MATCH
    3. Dat.: Die Hitze schadet den Äpfeln. -- NO match
    4. Akk.: Wir sehen die Äpfel. -- MATCH
  • gruselige Geheimnisse
    • strong declension
      1. Nom.: Gruselige Geheimnisse sind unheimlich. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Er brüstete sich gruseliger Geheimnisse. -- MATCH
      3. Dat.: Gruseligen Geheimnissen mangelt es nicht an Spannung. -- NO match
      4. Akk.: Man muss gruselige Geheimnisse nicht immer mögen. -- NO match
    • weak declension
      1. Nom.: Die gruseligen Geheimnisse kennt niemand. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Er gedachte der gruseligen Geheimnisse. -- NO match
      3. Dat.: Heinrich ist den gruseligen Geheimnissen zugetan. -- NO match
      4. Akk.: Julia liebt die gruseligen Geheimnisse. -- NO match
    • mixed declension
      1. Nom.: Seine gruseligen Geheimnisse sind langweilig. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Er wurde ihrer gruseligen Geheimnisse habhaft. -- NO match
      3. Dat.: Willi schenkt meinen gruseligen Geheimnissen große Aufmerksamkeit -- NO match
      4. Akk.: Hans fürchtet unsere gruseligen Geheimnisse. -- NO match
  • Glaube
    1. Nom.: Sein Glaube ist stark. -- NO match
    2. Gen.: Er brüstete sich seines Glaubens. -- NO match
    3. Dat.: Sie schenkte seinem Glauben keine Beachtung. -- MATCH
    4. Akk.: Sie fühlte ihren Glauben schwinden. -- MATCH
  • schwarzer Humor
    • strong declension
      1. Nom.: Schwarzer Humor kann verletzend sein. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Sie bedienst sich schwarzen Humors. -- NO match
      3. Dat.: Schwarzem Humor fehlt oft jegliche Sensibilität. -- MATCH
      4. Akk.: Man muss schwarzen Humor nicht immer mögen. -- NO match
    • weak declension
      1. Nom.: Der schwarze Humor ist weit verbreitet. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Er brüstete sich des schwarzen Humors. -- NO match
      3. Dat.: Heinrich ist dem schwarzen Humor zugetan. -- NO match
      4. Akk.: Julia liebt den schwarzen Humor. -- NO match
    • mixed declension
      1. Nom.: Ein schwarzer Humor ist besser als gar kein Humor. -- NO match
      2. Gen.: Er bediente sich eines schwarzen Humors. -- NO match
      3. Dat.: Sie hat noch nie etwas vom einem schwarzen Humor gehört. -- NO match
      4. Akk.: Ich würde das einen schwarzen Humor nennen. -- NO match

What you can learn for sure from these examples is that "voller" provides an environment where strong declension has to be used for adjectives. But when you want to find out which case to use, it becomes very confusing.

Let's try it again with "Äpfel" but now with an additional adjective, and in strong declension only (weak and mixed will never match):

Der Korb war voller roter Äpfel.

  • rote Äpfel
    1. Nom.: Rote Äpfel schmecken gut. -- NO match
    2. Gen.: Er bemächtigte sich roter Äpfel. -- MATCH
    3. Dat.: Die Hitze schadet roten Äpfeln. -- NO match
    4. Akk.: Wir sehen rote Äpfel. -- NO match

Lets add an adjective to "Glaube" too:

Das Volk sang voller innigem Glauben in der Messe mit.

  • inniger Glaube
    1. Nom.: Inniger Glaube ist selten. -- NO match
    2. Gen.: Er brüstete sich innigen Glaubens. -- NO match
    3. Dat.: Sie schenkte innigem Glauben keine Beachtung. -- MATCH
    4. Akk.: Sie fühlte innigen Glauben aufkeimen. -- NO match

So, when the noun is in plural, it seems to be in genitive case. But when you use a noun in singular, it seems to be dative case. This is very weird!

I didn't not find any resources on internet, that brings more light to this strange behaviour of "voller".

4

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.