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What is the difference between Mitbewerber and Solidarhafter? Google translate says "competitor" and "more solidarity", which neither make any sense.

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And why is there no option for "family/relative"? Which of the two above would be more appropriate in this case

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    Are you sure it is Mitbewerber? Could it also be Mitbewohner? Feb 9 at 11:22
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    Please provide some more context. Are you reading this on a certain form, or where do you have this from? Feb 9 at 11:22
  • yes it appears on a form
    – user610620
    Feb 9 at 11:31
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    I will put this as a comment since it is only a hypothesis: Mitbewerber is a pedantic substitute for Mitbewohner. In this context it means co-applicant (which is the literal meaning of the compound), not competitor (which is its usual meaning).
    – David Vogt
    Feb 9 at 11:44
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    A family member seems to intuitively fit the definition of both co-applicant (mitbwerber) and gaurantor (solidarhafter). Which would be viewed more favorably when applying against the competition, while also giving the impression of two warm bodies in the apartment to meet the priority for non-sole applicants rule for multi-room homes
    – user610620
    Feb 9 at 11:45
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Mitbewerber normally means "competitor" but in this context clearly is meant to be somebody who is going to live in the apartment with you and split the rent.

Solidarhafter is somebody who is not going to live in the apartment with you, but agrees to be co-liable for the rent if you cannot or will not pay.

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Jonathan Scholbach explains Solidarhafter.

Mitbewerber is any co-signer of a lease who is not married to, not in a civil union with (eingetragener Parter in your list), or a child of the lessee. For example, if a non-married couple or two friends want to rent a flat and both want to sign the lease contract, both are Mitbewerber of the other.

Why is there no option for "family/relative"?

Family in the legal context of renting an appartment are the spouse and the children of the tenant. These are both mentioned in your list ("Ehepartner" and "Kind"). Other relatives, such as siblings, cousins, or uncles, are not family members and are considered Mitbewerber like non-related persons.

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Solidarhafter seems to be the Swiss German word for what is called Bürge in German German, i.e. "bailsman", "guarantor". This is a person that binds themselves legally to fulfill the obligation for a certain party of a legal contract, in case the contractor themselves defaults.

I guess, the typical example in the context oft letting / renting is the following: When letting to students, who typically have no own income, some landlords demand a Bürge, a role typically taken by the parents of the student: When the tenant does not pay their rent, the landlords can sue the Bürge to pay the rent.

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  • what if the Solidarhafter is listed as a tenant of the property. doesn't that automatically imply that this guarantor plans to occupy the space physically to fulfill the requirement that "priority will not be given to single tenant applicants of 3 room apartments"?
    – user610620
    Feb 9 at 11:33

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