0

I am unable to identify this usage as either Perfekt or Passiv or Infinitiv usage. Should this be categorized as a "fixed phrase"?

etw ist auf ... zurückzuführen

2

In the combination sein + zu-infinitive, sein is an infinitregierendes Modalitätsverb. It's not a fixed phrase, but a productive pattern.

Other verbs of these class are haben, scheinen and drohen if they appear with a zu-infinitive:

  • Das ist darauf zurückzuführen.
  • Die Niederlage hat der Trainer zu verantworten.
  • Die Begrüßung scheint hier Brauch zu sein.
  • Dieses Ereignis droht in Vergessenheit zu geraten.

Ist + zu-infinitive is special because it corresponds to a passive construction, while the other ones work like a active verb.

While scheinen and drohen have a rather specific meaning in that context, sein + zu-infinitive can express different modalities:

  • Das ist anzunehmen. ('That can/must be assumed.' ~ 'Probably')
  • Reden ist zu unterlassen! ('Talking must be forbeared!' ~ 'Stop talking!')
  • Das ist nicht zu unterschätzen. ('That may not be underestimated.')
  • Das ist nicht zu glauben. ('That can't be believed.' ~ 'That's unbelievable.').
1
1

This is not a "fixed phrase" - but a "fixed form"

etwas ist auf etwas zurückzuführen etwas ist anzunehmen etwas ist nachzuweisen

This form is called a Infinitiv Aktiv, here forming a construct similar to the Latin Gerundivum, in your example of the verb "zurückführen". It expresses modality as in "can", "must", "should".

English uses a similar fixed form with "to be to", expressing "must"

The defendant is to be punished

der Angeklagte ist zu bestrafen

1

This site is temporarily in read only mode and not accepting new answers.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .