2

On the topic of “Verbalkomplex” the grammis website from the Leibniz-Institut für Deutsche Sprache offers many examples. So far, I have worked out the structure of most of them except one –

[16] ... weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) wird geschrieben worden sein müssen.

My guess is that it is in the Future perfect tense, passive voice with the modal verb “müssen”.

However, the Deutsche Grammatik 2.0 website specifically mentions that this kind of structure is wrong.

Falsche Bildung der Futur-2-Formen mit Modalverb im Passiv

Auch für die Bildung des Futurs 2 Passiv mit Modalverb finden sich auf meinen Seiten und anderswo mehr oder weniger freundliche ;-) Kommentare auch von Muttersprachlern, die meinen, dass diese Form folgendermaßen gebildet werden müsste:

(* * Futur Passiv 2 mit Modalverb: Das Kind wird operiert worden sein müssen.* *)

Diese Form ist nicht korrekt, weshalb ich sie mit zwei Sternen markiert und eingeklammert habe.

Denn auch hier gilt, was ich im dritten Teil der Serie über die Bildung der falschen Aktivform gesagt habe: Diese Form ist offensichtlich nach einer Regel gebildet, die man umgangssprachlich ungefähr so formulieren könnte: „Nehme das Futur 2 Passiv ohne Modalverb („Das Kind wird operiert worden sein.“) und hänge das Modalverb („müssen“) im Infinitiv hinten dran.“

I have also found a Stack Exchange Post that discusses this same topic, but I don’t seem to find a clear answer.

My replacement for the example would be:

... weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) wird haben geschrieben werden müssen.

Is the example clause a colloquial structure and would my proposal also be correct?

1
  • 2
    The example is even for native speakers hardly understandable. While they'd get the notion, the average person could not tell which part is which in regard to passive, future II, auxiliary etc. Thus I wouldn't bother too much with example 16 which is probably grammatical but not acceptable in the linguistical sense. It's a very hypothetical construct with few to none practical relevance. – amadeusamadeus Mar 24 at 16:28
1

For simplicity, I will remove bis morgen and von Hans and use the standard word order.

Auxiliary verb

Let's start with the verb müssen, which is the auxiliary, but also the finite verb of the sentence.

Präsens: …, weil der Brief {geschrieben worden sein} muss.

Futur I: …, weil der Brief {geschrieben worden sein} müssen wird.

  • facultative (!) conversion: …, weil der Brief wird {geschrieben worden sein} müssen.

This means the auxiliary verb müssen semantically doesn't apply now (in the present), but only in the future. It is Futur I, however. For comparison:

?Futur II: …, weil der Brief {geschrieben worden sein} gemusst haben wird.

This Futur II form is not recommendable at all and should be avoided. As I understand it, the article about 'wrong Futur II forms' is about that aspect. But here it's Futur I!

Infinitive

We know now that müssen applies in the future, but the infinitive that müssen governs can have different tenses, too:

Vorzeitigkeit (anteriority): …, weil der Brief geschrieben worden sein müssen wird.

Gleichzeitigkeit (simultaneity): …, weil der Brief geschrieben werden müssen wird.

Geschrieben worden sein is the Infinitiv (!) Perfekt Passiv, while geschrieben werden is the Infinitiv Präsens Passiv.

This tells us that in the future once müssen applies, the letter will have to be already written before, not only then. This is the 'Futur II component', but neither müssen wird nor geschrieben worden sein are Futur II!

Summary

The sentence is in Futur I, and the Infinitiv Perfekt Passiv tells us that what is object to müssen must be done before (anteriority).

The difference between Futur I and Future II is whether the future auxiliary werden governs an infinitive present or an infinitive perfect. If we have a second auxiliary (like müssen), it adds an additional layer between, so that it depends on whether müssen is infinitive present or infinitive perfect. See this final overview where the {} parenthesize the infinitive and the future auxiliary that are decisive for whether the sentence is Futur I or Futur II:

…, weil der Brief {geschrieben werden + wird}. -> Futur I

…, weil der Brief {geschrieben worden sein + wird}. -> Futur II

…, weil der Brief geschrieben werden {müssen + wird}. -> Futur I

…, weil der Brief geschrieben worden sein {müssen + wird}. -> Futur I (!)

…, weil der Brief geschrieben worden sein {gemusst haben + wird}. -> Futur II

2

The example sentence on Deutsche Grammatik 2.0 is different from yours in respect to which verb is in the past (relative to the future).

Take what they call the correct version:

Das Kind wird haben operiert werden müssen.

Seen from the future, "müssen" is what is in the past. The need for the child to get surgery is over at that point. You can also see that in the alternative formulation they provide:

Ich vermute, dass das Kind hat operiert werden müssen.

I'll construct their example step by step to make this clear:

Das Kind wird operiert.
(add "müssen in present tense) => Das Kind muss operiert werden.
(set "müssen" to perfect tense) => Das Kind hat operiert werden müssen.
(set to future) => Das Kind wird haben operiert werden müssen.

On the other hand, your grammis example:

... weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) wird geschrieben worden sein müssen.

Here, it's not müssen, but only schreiben that is in the past (seen from the future). At the point of time of tomorrow, something must be finished (=in perfect): the letter must have been written by then.

Der Brief wird geschrieben.
(set to perfect) => Der Brief ist geschrieben worden.
(add müssen in present tense) => Der Brief muss geschrieben worden sein.
(set to future) => Der Brief wird geschrieben worden sein müssen.
(in a subordinate clause) => ... weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) wird geschrieben worden sein müssen.

So all in all this example isn't actually Futur II. It's just Futur I of "müssen", and müssen refers to something that must have happened in the past relative to "müssen".

Ich muss W. einen Brief zum Geburtstag schreiben.
Damit der Brief rechtzeitig ankommt, werde ich ihn bis morgen geschrieben haben müssen.
Morgen früh wird der Brief geschrieben worden sein müssen.

As an aside: in real life, every sane person would simplify this. e.g. to:

Morgen früh muss der Brief geschrieben sein.

For your example:

...weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) geschrieben sein muss.
or: ...weil der Brief bis morgen (von Hans) geschrieben werden muss.

From what I explained, it's also clear that I don't agree that the sentence

Das Kind wird operiert worden sein müssen.

is incorrect per se. It just has a different meaning from the one that the author of Deutsche Grammatik 2.0 wants to convey, as seen in their alternative formulations.

If we want to convey that the child needs surgery that has to have been finished before some point in time (e.g to avoid adverse long term consequences), then what they call incorrect would actually be correct:

Das Kind wird [innerhalb der nächsten 24 Stunden] operiert (worden) sein müssen.

The respective alternative formulation would be:

Ich vermute, dass das Kind [innerhalb der nächsten 24 Stunden] operiert (worden) sein muss.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.