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This is an excerpt from todays DW Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten:

Russland hat die USA auf eine neue Liste "unfreundlicher ausländischer Staaten" gesetzt. Gleiches gilt für Tschechien. Mit der Einstufung gehen Einschränkungen für die Arbeit der Botschaften einher.

Duden provides this example for the use of einhergehen:

die Krankheit geht meist mit Fieber einher

which makes perfect sense translated into English as, "the illness is frequently accompanied by fever."

But the DW sentence interpreted in the same way would say, "The restrictions for work in the embassies is accompanied by the classification." The causality of this sentence appears to be reversed from what it should be.

What is the explanation?

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The order or structure of the arguments of einhergehen does not imply any causal relationship, only a correlation:

Regen geht oft mit Nässe einher.

Nässe geht oft mit Regen einher.

Furthermore, due to the flexible word order of German, you can put the mit-Part in the front:

Mit Nässe geht oft Regen einher.

Mit Regen geht oft Nässe einher.

without any change in meaning -- but it does make a difference in topic/focus.

Note that in both of your examples, the first argument is definite: mit der Einstufung, die Krankheit. This is because they are referring to objects from the previous context and re-state them as topic. Where the mit is put does really not matter at all.

So, they could totally have written instead

Die Einstufung geht mit Einschränkungen für die Arbeit einher.

But

Einschränkungen für die Arbeit gehen mit der Einstufung einher.

while correctly describing the same fact, fails to properly continue the previous sentence, since suddenly Einschränkungen is wrongly put in focus. That is, it is not wrong to write it like that, but it has an awkward information structure and soulds a bit clumsy here -- unless you intend to switch topic and continue to talk about the Einschränkungen more specifically:

Neue Einschränkungen für die Arbeit gehen mit der Einstufung einher und werden bewirken, dass ...

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  • Very interesting and informative discussion. But it raises 2 further questions. First, you say that the topic continued from the previous context is identified by a definite article, but then you seem to contradict that with your last example.
    – user44591
    May 15 at 15:02
  • The second question is more about the use of einhergehen itself. If einhergehen does not imply any causal relationship between the two topics, then it seems a very odd use in this case, because certainly the restrictions arise entirely as a consequence of the classification, and the reverse would make no sense at all. So how does it make sense to use einhergehen in this context?
    – user44591
    May 15 at 15:05
  • Indeed, it would be better to describe the restrictions as a consequence of the classification.
    – RalfFriedl
    May 15 at 16:04
  • Yeah, topic/focus are often quite intertwined and of course I expressed that suboptimally. I tried to fix it a bit. // The definiteness alone does not mark anything, but in this case is used as an information structural device to refer to something given in the background, that is continued as topic. May 16 at 8:45
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But the DW sentence interpreted in the same way would say, "The restrictions for work in the embassies is accompanied by the classification." The causality of this sentence appears to be reversed from what it should be.

What is the explanation?

The explanation is that your translation is reversed from what it should be. The original sentence is perfectly correct.

Mit der Einstufung gehen Einschränkungen für die Arbeit der Botschaften einher.

Think of it as:

With the classification come restrictions for the work of the embassies.

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  • Unfortunately, your interpretation appears to make the Duden example, cited above, nonsense: "With fever comes often the illness." It is backwards. Unless the order of the words is important to the meaning, which in my understanding of German that is never the case. My understanding of German is that the order only changes emphasis, not meaning. Is this verb an exception to that principle?
    – user44591
    May 17 at 14:58
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The classification is accompanied by restrictions for the embassies.

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