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Would someone please elaborate on what is the difference in meaning for Wir wissen Bescheid and just Wir wissen in the following dialog?

– Du lachst. Wir machen gleich weiter mit Sprints.
– Ja, Max, wir wissen Bescheid. Du bist der Schnellste.
– Okay, Max ist vielleicht am schnellsten, aber ich kann am weitesten schießen

source: https://youtu.be/4-eDoThe6qo?t=5519

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    Please post the full quotes here. Nobody wants to watch arbitrary videos just to find out what you're asking.
    – PMF
    May 19 at 7:45
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    Thank you! This is just a dialog. – Du lachst. Wir machen gleich weiter mit Sprints. – Ja, Max, wir wissen Bescheid. Du bist der Schnellste. – Okay, Max ist vielleicht am schnellsten, aber ich kann am weitesten schießen. May 19 at 7:56
  • @PMF: In general I agree, but this is part of a DW German course so I don't think it's a mortal sin; I for one still need listening practice and there are worse ways to get it than Nicolas Weg. But yes, 90% of the regulars here are native speakers or at least fluent, so having to watch a video to get the context is a waste of time for them.
    – RDBury
    May 19 at 8:09
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The difference between "Wir wissen Bescheid." and "Wir wissen." is that the former idiomatic, while the latter is not.

In general, the verb "wissen" is almost exclusively used with an object ("Er weiß es.", "Sie weiß davon", ...) or a descriptive phrase ("Sie wissen, wo es ist.").

The brief statement "Ich weiß.", which is usually uttered to indicate the speaker already knows about a fact, is some kind of an exception. This becomes apparent when we try to turn that sentence around to anything other than first person singular: "Du weißt.", "Sie weiß.", "Wir wissen.", "Ihr wisst.", "Sie wissen." all sound kind of incomplete. Unlike "Ich weiß.", all the other forms make me want to add an "es" at the end, or turn it around to "Das weißt du.", "Das weiß sie." etc.

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Welcome to German SE! In the video it appears that Max is about to tell everyone that he's the fastest player on the team, something he apparently brings up quite a lot, and the speaker is heading him off by saying something like "We already know all about that," or "We know all about that without your having to tell us." So in this case Bescheid is simply an intensifier to change "We know" to "We know all about it." By itself, Bescheid means "information" or "report", but Bescheid wissen is at least partly an idiom; see Wiktionary and DWDS. I'd translate the line as "Yes, Max, we get the message. You're the fastest." At least that's the American version, I'm not sure about UK, Australia, etc.

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