0

I would like to express with a nominal group the same as "Dreistigkeit beweisen" which I think I do here with "ein Zeichen von Dreistigkeit". Is the following example correct?

Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass er dieses Zeichen von Dreistigkeit als eine Beleidigung auffasste.

May we say

Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass er diesen Beweis von Dreistigkeit als eine Beleidigung auffasste.

I understand that "ein Nachweis von Dreistigkeit" would not be semantically possible, "Nachweis" is more a scientific proof, a proof which can be endorsed by facts.

Would you say other ways of saying ?

1
  • 1
    Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass er diesen Beweis von Dreistigkeit als eine Beleidigung auffasste. to be grammaticaly correct, accusative. Jul 22, 2021 at 12:40

2 Answers 2

3

You can use the words that you suggested:

Zeichen von Dreistigkeit
Beweis von Dreistigkeit
Nachweis von Dreistigkeit
Äußerung von Dreistigkeit

However, when talking about style, the verb in "Dreistigkeit beweisen" is very weak and doesn't add much meaning. Also, the noun Dreistigkeit isn't only used to characterize a person that is "dreist", but also acts that are "dreist". You could even say that "Dreistigkeit" is more apt to describe an action than a person's character trait, since almost nobody is "dreist" all the time.

So, "dieser Beweis von Dreistigkeit" can just be called "diese Dreistigkeit", which sounds much more succinct.

Sein respektloses Verhalten ist eine Dreistigkeit.

Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass er diese Dreistigkeit als eine Beleidigung auffasste.

0
  • zeigen, Zeichen
    • zeigen (verb) = to show, to exhibit, to indicate, to evidence, ...
    • das Zeichen (noun) = the sign, the indication, ...
  • beweisen, Beweis
    • beweisen (verb) = to prove, to attest, to demonstrate, to evidence, ...
    • der Beweis (noun) = the proof, the evidence, ...
  • dreist, Dreistigkeit
    • dreist (adjective) = impudent, brazen, brash, perky, ...
    • die Dreistigkeit (noun) = the audacidy, the presumptuousness, the brazenness, the impudentness, ...

You want to have a phrase that expresses the same as

  • Dreistigkeit beweisen = to prove audacidy

So, the meaning of this phrase is "to prove that someone is audacious" or "to attest that someone is impudent" etc.

The noun, that is closest related to the verb "beweisen" is "der Beweis", so the best solution of your problem is one of these:

  • nominal group with genitive attribute

    der Beweis der Dreistigkeit
    the proof of audacidy

  • nominal group with predicative attribute

    der Beweis von Dreistigkeit
    the proof of audacidy

  • compound noun

    der Dreistigkeitsbeweis
    the proof of audacidy

I would prefer the first version (der Beweis der Dreistigkeit), but all three are correct.


But the question is, if your assumption really was the best choice. I wouldn't have used »Dreistigkeit beweisen«. There are other possibilities:

  1. Er wird Dreistigkeit beweisen.
    He will prove audacidy.

  2. Er wird Dreistigkeit zeigen.
    He will show audacidy.

  3. Er wird dreist sein.
    He will be impudent.

In my opinion #3 is the best choice, and #2 is the second. I would not use the verb "beweisen" together with "Dreistigkeit". You can use "beweisen" together with "Mut" ("Mut beweisen" = to show/demonstrate courage), but "Mut beweisen" is what we call a "feste Fügung" (I don't know the exact English term for it; I think "fixed arrangement" or "fixed phrase" describes it very well). You can't replace a part of if with another word. This will destroy the fixed arrangement, and the meaning that the fixed arrangement had, will not transfer to the new phrase.

So, you better use one of these:

  1. Anna hat Mut bewiesen. → Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass Bernd diesen Mutbeweis als eine Beleidigung auffasste.
    Anna has shown courage. → It turned out that Bernd took this proof of courage as an insult.

  2. Anna war dreist. → Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass Bernd diese Dreistigkeit als eine Beleidigung auffasste.
    Anna was audacious. → It turned out that Bernd took this audacity as an insult.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.