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This line appears among the subtitles to the Tatort episode titled, Anne und der Tod:

Seit er ein Pflegefall ist, hat sie ihn auf Diät gesetzt und sich auf Schwarzwälder Kirsch und Eierlikör!

I am unable to understand the grammar, and therefore the translation, in this part of the sentence:

und sich auf Schwarzwälder Kirsch und Eierlikör!

This looks like an independent clause without a subject or a verb. "und sich" appears be the connection but I cannot interpret it, except to say it appears to be saying what the diet contained. Is this correct, standard German grammar? Please advise.

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Normally, the word und joins two full sentences. However, if the subject or the verb or both are the same, it is seen as elegant to not repeat them in the second sentence. This can become kind of hard to grasp, especially if it's combined with unfamiliar idiomatic expressions.

It's basically the same in English though:

He always saw his father as a role model, and himself as kind of a fraud.

The part after and refers to subject and verb of the main phrase.

So for your example, if you don't shorten the second part, the whole sentence becomes:

Seit er ein Pflegefall ist, hat sie ihn auf Diät gesetzt, und [sie hat] sich (selbst) auf Schwarzwälder Kirsch und Eierlikör [gesetzt]!

Does that make it more understandable?

"Jemanden auf Diät setzen" is quite common as an idiom, but "jemanden auf Schwarzwälder Kirsch und Eierlikör setzen" is a bit of a stretch as an expression, and even more so "sich auf Schwarzwälder Kirsch und Eierlikör setzen". The context and the reuse of the verb make it clear that "sich auf etwas setzen" is meant in the sense of "put oneself on a diet of something" instead of "sit down on something".

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  • 9
    Also "being on a cake diet" is a running gag (substitute anything else for "cake", the unhealthier the better).
    – AnoE
    Sep 7 at 9:37

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