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Newly I was reading an insurance policy and I have read this sentence:

Die Kosten sind auf Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen.

I know that the verb abziehen can come with von, not with auf, like "die Kosten sind von Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen" and this would mean "the costs will be deducted from my invoice" but using auf made me confused. What is the meaning in this case?

The full sentence is:

Sofern Sie mit Ihrem Zahnarzt eine Privatvereinbarung für Kunststoffüllungen getroffen haben, ist unser Zuschuss für Füllungen auf Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen.

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    Could you provide a bit more context, maybe link the policy if it's public? Costs being deducted from or on an invoice doesn't make a lot of sense. I would except a credit note to include deducted costs, but a bill usually adds up costs to arrive at a total payable sum.
    – YetiCGN
    Sep 7, 2021 at 11:20
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    It might be clearer, if you tell us, what kind of costs they are talking about. Sep 7, 2021 at 15:34
  • @ user unkown the full sentence is "sofern Sie mit Ihrem Zahnarzt eine Privatvereinbarung für Kunststoffüllungen getroffen haben, ist uner Zuschuss für Füllungen auf Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen"
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 7, 2021 at 16:42

2 Answers 2

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When they use "auf" they have the process of doing that in mind, means how a person takes the sheet of paper and writes the calculation on the paper. That style is common German.

The sentence "der Zuschuss ist von Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen" is the same as "der Zuschuss ist auf Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen". The first one more sees the bill in an abstract sense, the second one sees it more as written stuff on paper.

Another example with "abziehen+auf" is:

Er sagt, die Summe ist in der Rechnung nur auf dem Tablet abzuziehen, aber nicht auf dem Handy.

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  • Thank you, so is it the same as " der Zuschuss für Füllungen ist VON Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen" like the contribution has to be deducted FROM the bill"?
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 8, 2021 at 18:49
  • can you please make another example of using abziehen+auf ?
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 8, 2021 at 18:50
  • @AIB: OK, I replied to your additional questions as edit of my answer
    – äüö
    Sep 9, 2021 at 7:17
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The translation is very straightforward:

The costs have to be deducted on your invoice.

It means that the insurance company wants the deduction on the invoice, reducing the total rather than reimbursing you later.

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  • Thank you, the full sentence is "sofern Sie mit Ihrem Zahnarzt eine Privatvereinbarung für Kunststoffüllungen getroffen haben, ist uner Zuschuss für Füllungen auf Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen"
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 7, 2021 at 16:40
  • @AIB Yeah, that makes much more sense now. They are saying that their contribution has to be deducted on the bill that your dentist issues and is standard practice for a Zahnzusatzversicherung. Usually you would get a bill that states the original cost minus what your GKV (statutory health insurance) insurance has to pay minus what additional private insurance coverage you might have so that in the end you get a bill with the total remaining cost that you have to pay. The private insurance then squares the rest with the dentist.
    – YetiCGN
    Sep 8, 2021 at 17:42
  • thank you, I still didn't understand the expression "contribution has to be deducted on the bill " is it the same as " contribution has to be deducted from the bill", like reduced from the bill? in german is it the same as " der Zuschuss für Füllungen ist von Ihrer Rechnung abzuziehen" instead of "auf"?
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 8, 2021 at 18:41
  • would you please make another example of using abziehen+ auf ?
    – Dr.Noob
    Sep 8, 2021 at 18:52
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    "...auf der Rechnung..." but yes. There is a slight difference, in that "on" explicitly states the deduction has to appear on the bill as a postion. If you deduce the contribution "from" the bill, you could also do it while settling the bill (e.g. by wire transfer) without the need for it to appear on the bill. A small discount ("Skonto" in German) in commercial trade usually works like this: You can deduct the discount from the bill if you pay early but it's not on the bill because the merchant doesn't know whether you're taking the option or not when writing the bill.
    – YetiCGN
    Sep 10, 2021 at 9:01

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