-3

How do you say, “Beyond repair” or “It’s totally broken.” in German? The word I’m looking for sounds like, “Oshkishspeel.” Maybe “Augsiespiel”. Possibly means, “Outdated.”

I found the answer on my own from a hint someone gave of a word that begins with “aus”. I have no idea how to thank the gentleman because I don’t have “50 reputations” or something ridiculous. I am NOT happy with you all. This is my first time, too. Nor do I know how to get back to that page for fear of losing my place on THIS one to let you know. The word is “ausgespielt” - played out or finished. I was MUCH closer than ANY of you all! I don’t even speak German!🙄

9
  • 3
    Is ausgespielt, past participle of ausspielen, plausible? It only vaguely matches the definition. but I think it would match the sound you're describing.
    – RDBury
    Sep 12 at 22:34
  • 2
    I approved your edit, so you can copy/paste your extension to a new answer, which is what you should do. This way the answer can be accepted - even if it is made by yourself - and distinguish it from unanswered questions. Sep 13 at 4:35
  • 3
    "Ausgespielt" does not mean "broken beyond repair" or "totally broken" by any stretch, that's why nobody suggested it as an answer to a question that reads "How do you say, “It’s broken.” or “beyond repair” in German?". "Ausgespielt" can be used in a much narrower sense for a toy (and only a toy!) that has been played with so much that it doesn't have any purpose left, but mostly not because it is broken but because it's not interesting any more. Your second paragraph is a FY to people who tried to answer the question you posted, not the question you had in your head.
    – HalvarF
    Sep 13 at 6:23
  • 3
    I can only support HalvaR here: 'ausgespielt' is in no way usable as a translation to 'broken beyond repair' or 'totally broken'. So either you mis-interpret the context or you have been looking for a different word / asking the wrong question to the word you searched for. Sep 13 at 7:04
  • 1
    @RDBury: I didn't mean to criticize your comment at all, it was definitely worth mentioning "ausgespielt"! It really sounds so much like what the OP described. I just wanted to clarify that it doesn't mean what was asked for, which is why the new paragraph in the question is just so dopey.
    – HalvarF
    Sep 13 at 16:58
7

The most explicit and concise term for "beyond repair" is "irreparabel beschädigt" (literally, "irreparabel" means "not repairable", "unreparierbar", but the latter is not actually in use), though that term is rather only found in written language, if at all. More commonly, it is paraphrased as "so stark beschädigt, dass es nicht mehr repariert werden kann".

However, this doesn't really match "outdated", which would rather be expressed as "überholt", "obsolet" or "veraltet". But that's already the case in English, where "beyond repair" has a very different meaning from "outdated".

Now, looking at the phonetic approximations you provide, the term that I could think of is "ausgedient" (the complete phrase being "es hat ausgedient"). That means something like "it is not in service any more", which could both be because it is broken beyond repair or because it is being replaced with a more up-to-date device.

3

In informal settings: "total kaputt".

3
  • 3
    The English "kaput" is borrowed from kaputt, and Das ist kaputt is understandable to English speakers who have never studied German. I gather the German kaputt is just as informal as the English version.
    – RDBury
    Sep 12 at 18:51
  • 2
    IMHO, "kaputt" (and even "total kaputt") makes no statement about whether fixing is possible. Both "Meine Spülmaschine ist kaputt, ich brauche eine neue." and "Meine Spülmaschine ist kaputt, ich muss den Kundendienst rufen." (implying they will repair it rather than replace it with a new one) sound natural to me. For "total kaputt", it becomes more obvious when referring to people: "Ich bin total kaputt, ich muss gleich ins Bett." certainly implies that after a good night of sleep, the speaker will have replenished their energy rather than died. Sep 12 at 20:22
  • 1
    @O.R.Mapper Germans can even get a circulatory collapse and still live. ^^
    – YetiCGN
    Sep 13 at 13:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.