6

Is not time always precedes whatever is on the sentence Here are some examples like:

a) Dirk ist mit seinen Eltern und seiner Schwester nachts um 12 Uhr von Stuttgart losgefahren.

b) Dirk ist mit seinem Vater nachts um 12 Uhr von Stuttgart losgefahren.

My question is: Why doesn't "mit seinem Vater" come after "um 12 Uhr". It is a adverb as far as I know and exhibiting "manner". Really bogging my mind. How does he go --> "mit seinem Vater"

0
9

German does not have such a strict word order as English. The following 24 sentences are all correct, will be produced by German native speakers and will be understood:

Dirk ist mit seinem Vater nachts um 12 Uhr von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Dirk ist mit seinem Vater um 12 Uhr nachts von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Dirk ist mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart nachts um 12 Uhr losgefahren.
Dirk ist mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart um 12 Uhr nachts losgefahren.
Dirk ist nachts um 12 Uhr mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Dirk ist um 12 Uhr nachts mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Dirk ist von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater nachts um 12 Uhr losgefahren.
Dirk ist von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater um 12 Uhr nachts losgefahren.
Dirk ist nachts um 12 Uhr von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Dirk ist um 12 Uhr nachts von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Dirk ist von Stuttgart nachts um 12 Uhr mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Dirk ist von Stuttgart um 12 Uhr nachts mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Mit seinem Vater ist Dirk nachts um 12 Uhr von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Mit seinem Vater ist Dirk um 12 Uhr nachts von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Mit seinem Vater ist Dirk von Stuttgart nachts um 12 Uhr losgefahren.
Mit seinem Vater ist Dirk von Stuttgart um 12 Uhr nachts losgefahren.
Nachts um 12 Uhr ist Dirk mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Nachts um 12 Uhr ist Dirk von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Um 12 Uhr nachts ist Dirk mit seinem Vater von Stuttgart losgefahren.
Um 12 Uhr nachts ist Dirk von Stuttgart mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Von Stuttgart ist Dirk mit seinem Vater nachts um 12 Uhr losgefahren.
Von Stuttgart ist Dirk mit seinem Vater um 12 Uhr nachts losgefahren.
Von Stuttgart ist Dirk nachts um 12 Uhr mit seinem Vater losgefahren.
Von Stuttgart ist Dirk um 12 Uhr nachts mit seinem Vater losgefahren.

Here are the rules:

  • The finite verb must be at position 2.
  • All infinite verbs must be at the end of the sentence.
  • The subject must be at position 1 or 3.

All other rules are no grammatical rules. They are just guidelines about style and which part of speech should be accentuated. Most German native speakers don't know the rules you're talking about.


Addendum:

In one of the comments QBrute mentioned correctly, that also the finite verb can stand at position 1. So, you can create another 12 correct sentences that all begin with "Losgefahren ist Dirk ..."

4
  • It might be worth mentioning that word order means something, i.e. transports an emphasis. The "standard word order" the OP mentions ist the one that includes the least emphasis.
    – tofro
    Oct 24 at 7:50
  • You can place the infinite construct at the beginning though: "Losgefahren ist Dirk mit seinem Vater...", but I don't know if that's colloquial
    – QBrute
    Oct 24 at 10:01
  • 2
    You can do that if you want to emphasize the "Losgefahren", like in this conversation: "Ich habe gehört, dass Dirk gestern nachts um 2 Uhr angekommen ist". "Nein. Angekommen ist er um 3 Uhr. Losgefahren ist er um 2 Uhr." Used like this, this sentence structure is absolutely ok. Oct 24 at 11:16
  • Unfortunately many grammars teach TeKaMoLo as if it was a strict rule rather than a trend. I think the reason is that TeKaMoLo is never wrong and it's better to teach people a simple rule that works rather than have them try to master the nuances and end up sounding like Yoda half the time.
    – RDBury
    Oct 24 at 19:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.