2

While discussing a story with 2 native German speakers I said:

Und er ließ seine Augen mit Genugtuung über das reifende Feld gleiten, das mit den Blattreihen der Bohnen verziert waren, die alle jetzt im durchsichtigen Vorhang des Regens ummantelt waren.

and they corrected me as follows:

Und er ließ seine Augen mit Genugtuung über das reifende Feld gleiten, das mit den Blattreihen der Bohnen verziert waren, die jetzt alle im durchsichtigen Vorhang des Regens ummantelt waren.

Why is the time adverbial more correctly placed between the subject and the direct object of the final clause?

2 Answers 2

2

As Olafant said, the "corrected" version is more common and I had to read the "wrong" sentence a couple times to get it right.

The difference is as follows:

die jetzt alle

Puts emphasis on jetzt. Here you basically say

"Attention, it's happening now and to all of them"

While the other way around

die alle jetzt

analogously puts attention on the fact, that it's all of them

"Attention, it's all of them, and it's happening now

I suppose people usually emphasize the chronological importance, thus the first version is much more commonly heard/used and might cause the other (also correct) version to sound a bit off.

1
  • I thought about emphasis but couldn't really figure it out. If I read both of the sentences aloud, I would emphasize alle in both cases. But that's not mandatory. You have a point and one could see it this way. I think, the first version is more poetic.
    – Olafant
    Nov 22, 2021 at 10:43
2

Both versions are fine.

jetzt alle

might be more common. But there is nothing wrong with

alle jetzt

But there is another error:

In

... über das reifende Feld gleiten, das mit den Blattreihen der Bohnen verziert waren ...

waren refers to Feld. Since Feld is singular, it must be war instead of waren.

... das reifende Feld ..., das mit ... verziert war ...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.