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I can't understand why those 2 words have different meanings. Both use the word kommen and the aus preposition, but kommen aus means come from and auskommen means get along/manage. Example in sentence:

Ich komme aus Berlin = I come from Berlin

Ich komme gut aus = I get along well

I'm new to the language I really appreciate if someone can explain

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    I'm not sure I understand your question. Can you please elaborate? As you write yourself, it's two words with different meaning: "kommen aus/von/..." = to come from/to/... and "auskommen (mit)" = to get along (with). As happens in German often, "auskommen" is a separable verb. Commented Dec 30, 2021 at 9:02
  • ah I understand now, so the "aus" in auskommen is not a preposition but its the part of the verb right? what confuses me is the way that the "aus" in auskommen move backwards when you put it in the sentence
    – chris
    Commented Dec 30, 2021 at 9:15
  • Indeed. Seeing that this indeed is the issue, I phrased my comment with a bit further explanation as an answer. Commented Dec 30, 2021 at 9:44
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    I think your question is not very clearly stated. I read your question as “why do ‘auskommen’ and ‘kommen aus’ have different meanings” while by your comments the question is “why does ‘komme … aus’” in this sentence have the meaning of “auskommen”.
    – Carsten S
    Commented Dec 30, 2021 at 10:40

2 Answers 2

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Maybe it is a bit of a mix-up here:

As you write yourself, it's two words with different meaning:

"kommen aus/von/..." = to come from/to/...

and

"auskommen (mit)" = to get along (with).

As happens in German often, "auskommen" is a separable verb. Thus in the latter sentence "Ich komme gut aus" it is not a preposition, but part of the verb itself - which by the sentence structure is required to be split. That said, the sentence "Ich komme gut aus" is ok, but it leaves the listener a bit at suspence with the question "mit was?" (with what?). So usually it is amended by a phrase "mit XXX" to describe with whatever or whomever you get along well:

"Ich komme gut mit Dir aus" (I get along well with you)

or

"Ich komme gut mit meinem Gehalt aus" (I make ends meet well with my salary)

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    Separable verbs correspond to phrasal verbs in English; in fact kommen and auskommen have analogs in "come" and "come out". In "The turtle came out of its shell" the verb is "come", but in "The pictures came out well" the it's the phrasal verb "come out"; the pictures didn't come out of anything, they just came out. The analogs aren't exact ("come out" does not mean "get along"), and typically there are no analogs at all. But, as Carsten S points out, you can't always find the meaning from the parts, and this happens in English as well as in German.
    – RDBury
    Commented Dec 30, 2021 at 12:14
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The meaning of a word is something that has evolved over time. You generally cannot fully deduce it by looking at the individual parts. So you will just have to trust your dictionary on the meaning and usage of “auskommen”.

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