0

How does one understand the grammar in sentences such as these?

Alles was es braucht ist ein Fehler, rutscht man auf.

Was Sie brauchen ist ein langer Urlaub, irgendwo im Warmen.

Is the comma simply being conventionally omitted?

Alles , was es braucht, ist ein Fehler, rutscht man auf.

Was Sie brauchen, ist ein langer Urlaub, irgendwo im Warmen.

0

1 Answer 1

1

Alles, was es braucht, ist ein Fehler.

Correct. (= All it takes is one mistake). Emphasis is on the count of one, commas are needed as it is an apposition.

rutscht man auf

Plain wrong. 'Aufrutschen' is no verb. 'Ausrutschen' is (= to slip). Your sentence could be:

Alles, was es braucht, ist ein einziger Fehler, und schon rutscht man aus. Emphasis again on 'ein' or 'ein einziger' (= one single mistake).

Was Sie brauchen, ist ein langer Urlaub, irgendwo im Warmen.

Correct. (= What you need is holydays - at some warm place.) The first comma is correct, the second not incorrect, but it does shift the meaning a bit as it is an addendum in form of a shortened sentence. The second comma is replacable by a dash - see my english translation above. This is putting more emphasis on the suggestion to take more than just a few days off, sort of a double down. The sentence:

Was Sie brauchen, ist ein langer Urlaub irgendwo im Warmen.

is correct and in the form that you would learn in books.


Omitting commas may be trendy, but not the way to learn the language.

PS: Note that the title should read "What is the grammar for "was es braucht + sein"."

6
  • In my defense, the Germans sentences were copied verbatim from DWDS Textkorpora, where one will find the commas are very commonly, if not always, omitted.
    – user44591
    Commented May 4, 2022 at 20:01
  • 1
    @user44591: The subtitle examples are more typical of everyday conversation than, say, Die Zeit. But my understanding is that they are crowd-sourced, so they might not always use perfect punctuation.
    – RDBury
    Commented May 5, 2022 at 0:25
  • 1
    "aufrutschen" is definitely a verb and means "to move up". For instance, in a ranking list, etc.. The translation of the quoted sentence would be: All it takes is one error, once you move(d) up.
    – bakunin
    Commented May 5, 2022 at 9:09
  • Rutschen goes either downwards (abrutschen), lateral with falling included (ausrutschen), or lateral only (über's Eis rutschen, über die Festtage rutschen). No upwards movements in any case. The correct verb in your sense is "nachrücken" or "aufsteigen". Maybe "aufrutschen" is used that way in certain dialects, probably rather sociolects, but not in standard German.
    – starrin
    Commented May 5, 2022 at 11:00
  • 2
    Agree with @bakunin, "aufrutschen" is quite standard. E.g. "Könnt Ihr mal bitte aufrutschen?" when everybody is sitting in a row in the cinema or at a "Bierbank" and there's free space in the middle. I can't believe that it's not in the dictionaries.
    – HalvarF
    Commented May 5, 2022 at 12:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.