1

Before I begin, I wanted to state that I know that the genitive case is not common, and that it is often replace by the dative, but the above terms really confuse me.

Starting with possessive adjectives, it seems that they are the equivalent of the word “my, your, his, her …” in English, it is used with another word „Meine Katze“ but doesn’t the genitive case do the same thing? I was told that the genitive case is equivalent to « ‘s », but in English we can’t say mine’s or my’s or I’s, it would still be the possessive adjective my. So they both seem to mean my to me except that one already has a case so you don’t need declension.

Here's an example of the genitive case: Das Haus meiner Großeltern

3
  • 1
    The question is a bit unclear to me. Do you have an example with a genitive? Also, with regard to English: etymonline.com/word/his#etymonline_v_12036
    – David Vogt
    May 29, 2022 at 7:53
  • @DavidVogt Here’s a website I found with examples study.com/academy/lesson/german-genitive-pronouns.html
    – User
    May 29, 2022 at 14:41
  • That link helps. Consider adding the link and maybe one example to your question. For instance, das Haus meiner Großeltern "my grandparents' house". (Also note that the linked page doesn't talk about personal pronouns, as the questions title suggests.)
    – David Vogt
    May 29, 2022 at 16:20

4 Answers 4

2

I think you're mixing up something. German grammar doesn't use the concept of possessive adjectives (Possessivadjektive = besitzanzeigende Eigenschaftswörter). Something like this doesn't exist in German grammar. We have possessive pronouns (Possessivpronomen = besitzanzeigende Fürwörter) instead. They have some similarities with adjectives, but still behave different in most cases:

Most often you use adjectives and possessive pronouns as attributes of nouns:

  • Adjective used attributive

    Der süße Apfel schmeckt gut. (definite singular: with definite article)
    Ein süßer Apfel schmeckt gut. (indefinite singular: with indefinite article)
    Die süßen Äpfel schmecken gut. (definite plural: with definite article)
    Süße Äpfel schmecken gut. (indefinite plural: without article)

  • Possessive pronoun used attributive (indefinite usage is impossible)

    Mein Apfel schmeckt gut. (definite singular: without article)
    Meine Äpfel schmecken gut. (definite plural: without article)

But adjectives and possessive pronouns can also be used predicative (as part of the predicate if the verb is a copula):

  • Adjective used predicative

    Der Apfel ist süß.
    Ein Apfel ist süß.
    Die Äpfel sind süß.
    Äpfel sind süß.

  • Possessive pronoun used predicative

    Der Apfel ist meiner.
    Ein Apfel ist meiner.
    Die Äpfel sind meine.
    Äpfel sind meine.

If possessive pronouns are used predicative, you can add an article to the pronoun, in which case the declension of the pronoun changes. You can do the same with Adjectives:

  • Adjective used predicative

    Der Apfel ist der süße.
    Ein Apfel ist der süße.
    Die Äpfel sind die süßen.
    Äpfel sind die süßen.

  • Possessive pronoun used predicative

    Der Apfel ist der meine.
    Ein Apfel ist der meine.
    Die Äpfel sind die meinen.
    Äpfel sind die meinen.

Adjectives usually can also be used adverbial (if the verb is not a copula) which is stricly impossible for possessiv pronouns:

  • Adjective used predicative

    Der Apfel schmeckt süß.
    Ein Apfel schmeckt süß.
    Die Äpfel schmecken süß.
    Äpfel schmecken süß.

  • Possessive pronoun used predicative

    Der Apfel schmeckt meiner. Der Apfel schmeckt der meine.
    Ein Apfel schmeckt meiner. Ein Apfel schmeckt der meine.
    Die Äpfel schmecken meine. Die Äpfel schmecken die meinen.
    Äpfel schmecken meine. Äpfel schmecken die meinen.

Possessive pronouns are: mein, dein, sein, ihr, unser, euer

Here I show all declined forms of mein, representative for all other possessive pronouns:

  • attributive

    Nominativ (Gleichsetzungsnominativ)
    Das ist mein Vater. Das ist meine Mutter. Das ist mein Kind. Das sind meine Eltern.

    Genitiv (Genitivobjekt)
    Ich schäme mich meines Vaters. Ich schäme mich meiner Mutter. Ich schäme mich meines Kind. Ich schäme mich meiner Eltern.

    Genitiv (Genitivattribut)
    Die Kinder meines Vaters sind hier. Die Kinder meiner Mutter sind hier. Die Kinder meines Kindes sind hier. Die Kinder meiner Eltern sind hier.

    Dativ (Dativobjekt)
    Ich gebe das Geschenk meinem Vater. Ich gebe das Geschenk meiner Mutter. Ich gebe das Geschenk meinem Kind. Ich gebe das Geschenk meinen Eltern.

    Akkusativ (Akkusativobjekt)
    Ich beschuldige meinen Vater. Ich beschuldige meine Mutter. Ich beschuldige mein Kind. Ich beschuldige meine Eltern.

  • non-attributive, without article

    Nominativ (Gleichsetzungsnominativ)
    Siehst du diesen Löffel? Das ist meiner. Siehst du diese Gabel? Das ist meine. Siehst du dieses Messer? Das ist meines. Siehst du diese Gegenstände? Das sind meine.

    Genitiv (Genitivobjekt)
    Alle haben so schöne Löffel, aber ich schäme mich meines. Alle haben so schöne Gabeln, aber ich schäme mich meiner. Alle haben so schöne Messer, aber ich schäme mich meines. Alle haben so schöne Gegenstände, aber ich schäme mich meiner.

    Genitiv (Genitivattribut)
    Löffel sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung meines war teuer. Gabeln sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung meiner war teuer. Messer sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung meines war teuer. Gegenstände sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung meiner war teuer.

    Dativ (Dativobjekt)
    Welchem Vater soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es meinem. Welcher Mutter soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es meiner. Welchem Kind soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es meinem. Welchen Eltern soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es meinen.

    Akkusativ (Akkusativobjekt)
    Du fragst, welchen Vater ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige meinen. Du fragst, welche Mutter ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige meine. Du fragst, welches Kind ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige meines. Du fragst, welche Eltern ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige meine.

  • non-attributive, with article

    Nominativ (Gleichsetzungsnominativ)
    Siehst du diesen Löffel? Das ist der meine. Siehst du diese Gabel? Das ist die meine. Siehst du dieses Messer? Das ist das meine. Siehst du diese Gegenstände? Das sind die meinen.

    Genitiv (Genitivobjekt)
    Alle haben so schöne Löffel, aber ich schäme mich des meinen. Alle haben so schöne Gabeln, aber ich schäme mich der meinen. Alle haben so schöne Messer, aber ich schäme mich des meinen. Alle haben so schöne Gegenstände, aber ich schäme mich der meinen.

    Genitiv (Genitivattribut)
    Löffel sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung des meinen war teuer. Gabeln sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung der meinen war teuer. Messer sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung des meinen war teuer. Gegenstände sind meist billig, aber die Herstellung der meinen war teuer.

    Dativ (Dativobjekt)
    Welchem Vater soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es dem meinem. Welcher Mutter soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es der meinen. Welchem Kind soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es dem meinem. Welchen Eltern soll ich das Buch schenken? Ich schenke es den meinen.

    Akkusativ (Akkusativobjekt)
    Du fragst, welchen Vater ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige den meinen. Du fragst, welche Mutter ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige die meine. Du fragst, welches Kind ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige das meine. Du fragst, welche Eltern ich beschuldige? Ich beschuldige die meinen.


And now you might also see the difference to genitive case:

Genitive case is the case that marks a descent, lineage, stem, genealogy, parentage. (Latin casus genitivus = case of lineage; case of origin) (Other cases used in German: casus nominativus = case of naming; casus dativus = case of giving; casus accusativus = case of accusing). So, genitive case originally did not mean to whom something belongs, but from where something is coming. But it's usage goes far beyond origin or ownership.

Take this example (genitive attribute):

Das kleine Geschäft der Schrecken ist heute geschlossen.
The little shop of horrors is closed today.

Here the genitive attribute does not indicate an origin or an ownership. It indicated a class (of which kind is this little shop?) This is a capability that possessive pronouns do not have.

Genitive case can not only be used in genitive attributes, as shown in the previous example (describing a noun; here describing the little shop), but also as genitive objects which means that they belong not to a noun but to the sentence's verb:

Die Krähe bedient sich eines Stocks, um das Futter zu erreichen.

The verb sich bedienen needs a genitive object that names the tool that the crow uses.

Such construction do not exist in English, so the best English translation must use a different construction, that also exists in German:

The crow uses a stick to reach the food.
Die Krähe benutzt einen Stock, um das Futter zu erreichen.

This usage of Genitive case in German sentences is impossible for possessive pronouns.


Addendum

To make clear again, that there is nothing like "possessive adjectives" in German grammar, but only "possessive pronouns", I provide links to online dictionaries here. Please have a look there and read there to which »Wortart« (part of speech) these words belong:

Note that many dictionaries do not divide pronouns into subtypes (personal pronoun, relative pronoun, possessive pronoun, etc.) so the possessive pronouns are labeled just as "pronouns" in some dictionary. (But never as adjectives!)

Also note that for many possessive pronouns there exist homonymes which are not possessive pronouns and are listed together with the possessive pronouns in some dictionaries. Homonyes of possessive pronouns are personal pronouns and verbs, but never adjectives! Here is a list of all homonymes:

  • mein
    • possessive pronoun 1st pers. sing. („Das ist mein Auto.“)
    • short form of full verb („Ich mein das nicht böse.“ =„Ich meine das nicht böse.“)
  • dein
    • possessive pronoun 2nd pers. sing. („Das ist dein Auto.“)
  • sein
    • possessive pronoun 3nd pers. masc. sing. („Diese Auto gehört meinem Vater. Es ist sein Auto.“)
    • possessive pronoun 3nd pers. neut. sing. („Diese Auto gehört meinem Kind. Es ist sein Auto.“)
    • full verb („Heute möchte ich betrunken sein.“)
    • copula (a subtype of full verbs) („Ich möchte Lehrer sein.“)
    • auxiliary verb („Der Käse wird bald abgelaufen sein.“)
  • ihr
    • possessive pronoun 3rd pers. fem. sing. („Diese Auto gehört meiner Mutter. Es ist ihr Auto.“)
    • possessive pronoun 3rd pers. plur. („Diese Auto gehört meinen Eltern. Es ist ihr Auto.“)
    • personal pronoun 2nd pers. plur. („Ich freue mich, dass ihr gekommen seid.“)
    • personal pronoun 3nd pers. fem. sing. („Das ist Evas Buch. Es gehört ihr.“)
  • unser
    • possessive pronoun 1st pers. plur. („Das ist unser Auto.“)
    • personal pronoun 1st pers. plur. genitive („Herr, erbarme dich unser!“)
  • euer
    • possessive pronoun 2nd pers. plur. („Das ist euer Auto.“)
    • personal pronoun 2nd pers. plur. genitive („Wir werden euer gedenken!“)
4
  • Sorry, I’m still a bit confused. So the possessive articles this person talks about germanwithlaura.com/possessive-adjectives are actually attributive possessive pronouns?
    – User
    May 29, 2022 at 14:49
  • Yes. All these words are pronouns. There are similarities to adjectives, and even similarities to articles (that's why some people also use the name ”possessive article“), but in fact they are neither adjectives nor articles but pronouns. I added an addendum to my answer to make it even clearer. The author of the site linked by you also writes there: "better term: Possessive Determiners". "Determiner" is a supertype that contains articles, adjectives and pronouns. It's ok to name them possessive determiners but better, because more specific is possessive pronoun. And when you ... May 30, 2022 at 8:43
  • ... scroll down, you will see, that the term adjective is put in quotation marks very often, because the author knows that these words are not really adjectives but something that just has similarities to adjectives. The correct term is: possessive pronoun. May 30, 2022 at 8:46
  • Some textbooks on German grammar, not just the German with Laura site, do use the term 'possessive adjective'. I dislike the this terminology myself and prefer 'possessive determiner' for what is usually meant. English uses different words for possessive determiners vs. pronouns: "my" vs. "mine", "our" vs. "ours" etc. Meanwhile German uses almost the same words, with a few differences in inflection.
    – RDBury
    May 30, 2022 at 11:59
1

You cannot use the genitive of a personal pronoun in such a way that it replaces the possessive.

There are cases in which a genitive form of a pronoun seems to appear in a sentence, such as:

Die Materialisierung des Ichs

Here, Ich stands for a psychological concept. Its English translation is usually not I but self or ego. It is not really a pronoun but a noun.

The genitive of a possessive pronoun also cannot replace the possessive. Even if it could, this would not spare one from using the possessive.

However, the genitive of a possessive is used in German if the genitive form of a pronoun is required by some verb which takes a genitive object.

For example:

Der Manager nahm sich seiner an.

which means: The manager took care of him. Sich annehmen may take a genitive object. English take care works quite analogously, using the preposition of where German uses the genitive.

2
  • I beg to differ. The Ich-example is a non-example, I'm afraid. The noun Ich is just a substantivation of the first person singular personal pronoun ich and hence is declined as das Ich, des Ichs, dem Ich, das Ich (and perhaps die Ichs in plural whereas das Wir would be a different concept). Similarly, "Nach diesem netten Abend habe ich ihm das Du (not: dich!) angeboten". On the other hand, the personal pronouns have fullly-fledged cases of their own such as ich, meiner, mir, mich, where their genitive form looks suspiciously similar to possessive pronouns. May 29, 2022 at 11:07
  • The ich in the example is not really a pronoun. That's why I wrote a genitive form of a pronoun seems to appear in a sentence. There is no genitive of the pronoun Ich apart from the possessive, but the questioner seems to think there is one.
    – RHa
    May 29, 2022 at 11:12
0

In German, inflection of a noun phrase does not only change the noun itself. For example, it also changes the article.

Die Großeltern (Nom.) besitzen ein Haus.

Ich schenke den Großeltern (Dat.) einen Rasenmäher.

The genitive case is no exception:

Das ist das Haus der Großeltern. (Gen.)

“This is the grandparents’ house.” As you write, the genitive case here corresponds to adding a “‘s” in English. Of course, in English, the “‘s” is only added to the noun, it is “the grandparents’s”, not “the’s grandparents’” or “the’s grandparents”.

Here, it is actually only the article that changes, but both the article and the noun can change: “Das ist das Haus des Großvaters.”

Now it works the same with a possessive pronoun instead of an article:

Meine Großeltern (Nom.) besitzen ein Haus.

Ich schenke meinen Großeltern (Dat.) einen Rasenmäher.

The genitive case is no exception:

Das ist das Haus meiner Großeltern. (Gen.)

(The accusative case happens to be the same as the nominative case here.)

0

Genitive case is used in a variety of contexts. For beginners, the two most important ones are probably i) the genitive governed by certain prepositions and ii) the genitive used to subordinate one noun phrase to another.

aufgrund einer Erkrankung "because of an illness"
innerhalb des Gebäudes "inside the building"

der Hund meines Vermieters "my landlord's dog"
beim Öffnen der Fenster "when opening the windows"

As the different translations show, indications such as "genitive case corresponds to 's" (or to of) are simplifications.

As the third example shows, a possessive and a genitive can coexist: the genitive connects the dog to the landlord (i.e. it connects the two nouns), the possessive connects the landlord to the speaker (or the listener in case it was your, or to a person mentioned before in case it was her or his).

Finally, note that I have marked the endings in bold and they're fortunately really simple: feminine and plural determiners get -er (with no case ending on the noun) and masculine and neuter determiners get -es (with the noun usually ending in -(e)s as well).

Terminologically, I advise calling words such as einer, des, meines determiners, in German Artikel or Artikelwörter. They are different from pronouns in both form and function: determiners always occur with nouns, pronouns occur in place of noun phrases; pronouns have different endings than determiners in German.

Hast du den Kindern schon etwas gekocht? (determiner plus noun)
Nein, ich muss denen noch etwas aufwärmen. (pronoun)

"Have you cooked anything for the kids yet?"
"No, I have still have to heat something up for them."

Guck, da drüben sitzt ein Vogel. Und da ist noch einer.
"Look, there's a bird sitting over there. And here's another one."

These terminological choices are backed up by both the Duden grammar and the Institut für Deutsche Sprache in their low-brow and high-brow terminologies.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.