3

Führen means lead or guide. Führer is leader. Führerschein is, however, driving license. For driving, there is a more suitable word: fahren. So I expect driving license should be Fahrerschein.

Is there any interesting interpretation behind Führerschein (e.g. historical context, cultural thingy, root word), or it is just what it is?

2
  • Der Führer ist ein armes Schwein, denn er hat keinen Führerschein [Brösel, 1981]
    – tofro
    Jan 13, 2023 at 21:53
  • 1
    führen actually has a lot more meanings than just "lead or guide". You might want to consult a good dictionary.
    – tofro
    Jan 13, 2023 at 22:12

1 Answer 1

4

That's because German traffic legislation doesn't traditionally know anything about a "Fahrer". He's called a Kraftfahrzeugführer. (Probably because "fahren" doesn't necessarily mean "to steer" only, but also applies to passengers [Mitfahrer] - Wir fahren mit der Bahn, obwohl wir keine Lokführer sind - this is different to "to drive" in English).

Excerpt from the Straßenverkehrsgesetz §2:

Wer auf öffentlichen Straßen ein Kraftfahrzeug führt (sic), bedarf der Erlaubnis (Fahrerlaubnis) der zuständigen Behörde (Fahrerlaubnisbehörde). Die Fahrerlaubnis wird in bestimmten Klassen erteilt. Sie ist durch eine amtliche Bescheinigung (Führerschein) nachzuweisen.

(This is a relatively early law. More current legislation from the 21st century does, indeed, mainly use the term "Fahrer")

Austrian German and Swiss German help themselves by occasionally using Lenker and Chauffeur (but "Fahrer" as well) which are more specific.

You should indeed look up führen (which is the Kausativ of fahren and has the root notion of "etwas zum Fahren/Bewegen veranlassen" - It has a lot more meanings than just "lead or guide" - in a good dictionary. [Whereas yet again fahren has a lot more meanings than just "to drive"])

6
  • 2
    Zudem wurden früher die Wagen von Tieren gezogen, und diese wurden geführt. Jan 13, 2023 at 22:16
  • 1
    The legal jargon knows about a "Fahrerlaubnis" ("Fahr-Erlaubnis", "permission to drive"), though ;) The "Führerschein" is the physical document (for example a plastic card) that confirms the legal authorization to operate a vehicle in public space. See Wikipedia: "Ein Führerschein oder ein Führerausweis ist eine amtliche Bescheinigung, die ein Vorhandensein einer Fahrerlaubnis zum Führen bestimmter Fahrzeuge auf öffentlichem Verkehrsgrund belegt." Jan 14, 2023 at 9:13
  • 1
    But I mostly agree with your answer, especially since the term "Führerschein" was coined in the early 20th century. In this period, "führen" in the sense of "to control the movents and actions of something or somebody else" was a popular concept. The Nazis didn't fall in love with the term out of thin air ;) So it makes sense that the new term for the new concept used terminology that was "en vouge" at the time. Jan 14, 2023 at 9:17
  • 1
    @HenningKockerbeck A better source for Führerschein vs. Fahrerlaubnis: Wer auf öffentlichen Straßen ein Kraftfahrzeug führt, bedarf der Erlaubnis (Fahrerlaubnis) der zuständigen Behörde (Fahrerlaubnisbehörde). Die Fahrerlaubnis wird in bestimmten Klassen erteilt. Sie ist durch eine amtliche Bescheinigung (Führerschein) nachzuweisen. (StVG, §2)
    – tofro
    Jan 14, 2023 at 14:05
  • @HenningKockerbeck: It should also be noted that "Führerschein" is not a completely singular oddity. The term "Führer" as the one controlling a vehicle or other machine has "survived" in some other words, as well, such as "Führerhaus" and "Führerstand". Jan 14, 2023 at 16:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.