0

Is it normal to say "insgesamt werden"? As in

Die Flagge des 31. Mitgliedslandes der Militärallianz werde am Nachmittag vor dem Hauptquartier gehisst. Es werde ein guter Tag für die Sicherheit Finnlands, für die nordische Sicherheit und für die NATO insgesamt werden, sagte Stoltenberg.

Or is it a mistake, a superfluous addition of werden?

https://www.tagesschau.de/ausland/finnland-nato-121.html

3 Answers 3

4

That's correct German. The essence of the sentence is "Es werde ... werden". That's indirect speech futur. The "insgesamt" is something completely separate and just means "overall" or "as a whole" and refers NATO.

2
  • 1
    "insgesamt" belongs to "für die NATO". "für die NATO insgesamt" means "for NATO as a whole".
    – RHa
    Commented Apr 3, 2023 at 17:32
  • @Rha yes, it sure does, thanks. My main emphasis is that it does not belong to the verb. But you are right that it might be better to specify more directly what it belongs to and how. I amended my answer. Commented Apr 3, 2023 at 22:45
1

Es werde ein guter Tag [...] werden, sagte Stoltenberg.

is indirect speech. Konjunktiv 1 is used here: "es werde [...] werden" corresponding to Indikativ "es wird [...] werden".

Stoltenberg must have said: "Es wird ein guter Tag [...] werden."

"insgesamt" belongs to "für die NATO insgesamt" (= "für die gesamte NATO")

1

This is correct.

The whole paragraph is indirect speech, so it is in Konjunktiv I.

This is the original text:

Die Flagge des 31. Mitgliedslandes der Militärallianz werde am Nachmittag vor dem Hauptquartier gehisst. Es werde ein guter Tag für die Sicherheit Finnlands, für die nordische Sicherheit und für die NATO insgesamt werden, sagte Stoltenberg.

When you transform it into Indikativ it becomes:

Die Flagge des 31. Mitgliedslandes der Militärallianz wird am Nachmittag vor dem Hauptquartier gehisst. Es wird ein guter Tag für die Sicherheit Finnlands, für die nordische Sicherheit und für die NATO insgesamt werden.

If you strip off any parts of speech, that are not really necessary to understand the foundation construction, you get this:

  1. Die Flagge wird gehisst.
  2. Es wird ein guter Tag werden.

Semantically both sentences refer to the future, but grammatically, they use different tenses.

Sentence #1 uses Präsens. This tense is used when you talk about events that happen now, in the present, but it can also be used to talk about events that for sure will happen in the near future. This becomes more clear, when you add a temporal adverb like »morgen«, »bald« or similar (morgen = tomorrow, bald = soon)

Sentence #2 uses the tense Futur I

  • Präsens:

    Es wird ein guter Tag.
    It becomes a good day.

  • Futur 1:

    Es wird ein guter Tag werden.
    It will become a good day.

Note, that in sentence 2 we have the same verb (werden) twice in this sentence, just in different grammatical forms. The word wird in sentence 2 is an auxiliary verb that is here just for grammatical reasons. Is does not contribute to the proposition. It's only purpose is to indicate the tense Futur 1. This auxiliary verb translates to "will" in the English translation. Only the word werden at the end is the full verb which translates to "become" in English.

Compare this to the version in Präsens (sentence 1). This sentence does not contain any auxiliary verb. It only has the full verb, which must appear in the same grammatical form as the auxiliary verb in sentence 2 (3rd person singular), so it is »wird« and translates to "becomes".

German has 3 auxiliary verbs:

Haben, sein und werden
sind die drei Hilfszeitwörter auf Erden.

(To have, to be and to become are the three auxiliary verbs on earth.)

The verbs haben and sein are used to indicate different tenses of the past, werden indicates future tense. All three verbs do also exist als full verbs, ans there are sentences, where the verb appears in both forms:

Ich bin krank gewesen.
Ich habe Fieber gehabt.
Ich werde gesund werden.

1
  • Alles richtig, aber die Frage bezog sich auf "insgesamt werden". Der Fragesteller war offensichtlich der Ansicht, dass "ingesamt" zu "werden" gehört (wie z.B. in "das wird schön werden"). Commented Apr 19, 2023 at 23:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.