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Can I say

Ich habe geplant, den Apfel essen zu werden.

Because I can use "haben" for Perfekt and "werden" for Passiv, and the modal verbs too:

Mir wird befohlen, den Apfel essen zu müssen.
Er sagt, den Apfel essen zu sollen/dürfen.
Er sagt, den Apfel gegessen zu haben.
Der Apfel meint, gegessen zu werden.

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  • German futures are constructed with 'werden' and German perfects with 'haben', but for inexplicable reasons, perfect expressions can be used as inifinitives and future expressions cannot. It's just one of those things that language learners have to resignedly accept. Jun 17, 2023 at 8:44
  • @KilianFoth Then this seems like a valid point of confusion. Why was my question downvoted? Anyways, thanks for the answer. Jun 17, 2023 at 11:18

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No. That is not a natural-sounding sentence and I do not understand exactly what you are even trying to say with it and how its meaning is supposed to differ from "… den Apfel zu essen" (which is perfectly ok).

As for the others:

Mir wird befohlen, den Apfel essen zu müssen.

This sounds weird too. Better "… den Apfel zu essen". "Befohlen" kind of already implies "müssen".

Er sagt, den Apfel essen zu sollen/dürfen. Er sagt, den Apfel gegessen zu haben.

These are not wordings I would actively use. They are understandable, but using "sagen" with a zu-construction is certainly not common.

Der Apfel meint, gegessen zu werden.

While grammatically ok, how can an apple "mean" anything?

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