1

Could someone tell me, if it's possible to make a sentence mixing a Modalverb and a Verb with "Dass"?

Ich weiß, dass er wird morgen wegen seiner Erkältung nicht mit seinen Freunden ins Restaurant gehen können.

I know that he won't be able to go to the restaurant with his friends tomorrow because of his cold.

3
  • Dass "wird" wird wenn, dann am Ende des Satzes stehen: "Ich weiß, dass er morgen, wegen seiner Erkältung, nicht mit seinen Freunden ins Restaurant (gehen können wird) oder (gehen wird können) oder (wird gehen können). Commented Dec 13, 2023 at 16:31
  • @userunknown Großzügige Kommasetzung! Wird wird i.d.R. am Ende stehen, muss aber nicht. In einigen deutschsprachigen Regionen wird niemand Anstoß daran nehmen.
    – Olafant
    Commented Dec 13, 2023 at 16:53
  • @Olafant: Ja, mit der Kommasetzung hadere ich seit der Grundschule, außer bei Aufzählungen, da bin ich recht sicher, gewiss und sorglos. Commented Dec 13, 2023 at 16:59

3 Answers 3

3

Ich weiß, dass er wird morgen wegen seiner Erkältung nicht mit seinen Freunden ins Restaurant gehen können.

There is a problem with your word order, let us correct that first:

The main sentence is "ich weiß" (I know). It could stand on its own. Everything following the "dass" is just detailing what you know. In Hauptsatz (main sentence) the Verb has to be at second place and you got that right. In a Nebensatz (dependent sentence), though, the Verb (that is: the inflected part of the Verb) goes to last place:

dass er wird morgen wegen seiner Erkältung nicht mit seinen Freunden ins Restaurant gehen können.

The inflected part here is "wird". This has to go last and we get:

dass er morgen wegen seiner Erkältung nicht mit seinen Freunden ins Restaurant gehen können wird.

This is a perfectly grammatical (dependent) sentence. The construction at the end is called a "Doppelter Infinitiv" (double infinitive) and you can think about it like this:

Ich weiß, daß er [...] wird.

This begs the question: he will ... what??

Ich weiß, daß er [...] können wird.

This again begs a question: he will be able ... to do what??

Ich weiß, daß er gehen können wird.

Finally we get the complete information: he will be able to go (or in this case: come). Your sentence is negated in addition, but the mechanism is the same.

PS: see also here for some further twists in the correct order of Modalverben in constructions with the Doppelter Infinitiv.

2

Ich weiß nicht, ob er morgen wegen seiner Erkältung ins Restaurant wird gehen können.

Das ist auch der Fall im Perfekt: Ich wusste nicht, ob er ins Restaurant hat gehen können.

Diese Form heißt „Doppelinfinitiv" oder „zwei Infinitive" (in diesem Fall aber auch im Nebensatz).

1

In the spoken language, everybody will avoid the complex structure of the verbs in the subclause and render it as two main clauses:

"Ich weiß, morgen wird er wegen seiner Erkältung nicht ... ins Restaurant gehen können."

And in this case a flue seems to be a rather weak reason to prevent visiting the restaurant in absolute terms, so one would probably drop "nicht können" (cannot), but use the weaker and simpler:

"Ich weiß, morgen wird er (wohl) wegen seiner Erkältung nicht ... ins Restaurant gehen."

1
  • 1
    Man hat schon von Erkältungen gehört, die so heftig waren, dass derjenige nicht ins Restaurant hätte gehen können, sowie von Situationen, in denen sich öffentliche Einrichtungen den Besuch mit Erkältungssymptomen verbaten und jeder, der seinen Freunden eine Erkältung ersparen will, wird wegen seiner Skrupel nicht ins Restaurant gehen können - diese Bedeutung wird auch von "nicht können" umfasst. Commented Dec 13, 2023 at 16:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.