4

This sentence appears in Anthony Doerr's Alles Licht, das wir nicht sehen, Aus dem Englischen von Werner Löcher-Lawrence:

Heute ist ein schöner Tag, ein Tag, an den es sich zu erinnern lohnt.

DWDS says sich is optional with lohnen, but manditory for this meaning of erinnern. So if a sentence uses 2 reflexive verbs, can it have 2 sich's?

Heute ist ein schöner Tag, ein Tag, sich an den es sich zu erinnern lohnt.

And what is the meaning of the "sich sich", that I am finding so plentifully in DWDS?

2
  • 1
    "An sich ist heute ein schöner Tag, an den es sich sich zu erinnern lohnt, es sei denn, man hat sich verletzt." Potentially you can have an infinite amount of sichs in a sentence. Commented Jan 16 at 10:08
  • 1
    The vast majority of the "sich sich" corpus entries are simple typos (accidental word duplications). Occasionally the first "sich" is a misspelling (or mis-scan?) of "sie" ("daß sie sich als Bürger Finnlands fühlen"). Only a tiny fraction are correct (Fernliebe an sich lässt sich einkapseln). Commented Jan 16 at 14:28

1 Answer 1

8

Your sentence is wrong but the answer to you question is still: Yes, one sentence can have two "sich". Your example would in that case be:

Heute ist ein schöner Tag, ein Tag, an den es sich sich zu erinnern lohnt

Usually one would try to not do this and use a separate sub clause:

Heute ist ein schöner Tag, ein Tag, an den es sich lohnt, sich zu erinnern

Regarding your second question: Most of the examples on the linked pages are simple typos and usually should be "sie sich" or "sich sie"... this is a common mistake when typing these two words. Others are simply wrong duplications of "sich":

Sie sich:

Wrong: Sie muß Namen und Anschrift des Betroffenen, gegen den sich sich richtet, und die Rufnummer oder eine andere Kennung seines Telekommunikationsanschlusses enthalten.
Correct: Sie muß Namen und Anschrift des Betroffenen, gegen den sie sich richtet, und die Rufnummer oder eine andere Kennung seines Telekommunikationsanschlusses enthalten.

Duplicate sich:

Wrong: War irre freundlich, hat sich sich die ganze Zeit bedankt.
Correct: War irre freundlich, hat sich die ganze Zeit bedankt.

4
  • Two sichs are generally bad style, but I would avoid two consecutive sichs by rephrasing the sentence as Heute ist ein schöner Tag, ein Tag, an den es sich zu erinnern sich lohnt.
    – RHa
    Commented Jan 15 at 22:29
  • 2
    I would put that as … an den sich zu erinnern es sich lohnt.
    – Janka
    Commented Jan 15 at 23:12
  • 1
    I'd simply omit one sich: ... an den es sich zu erinnern lohnt. I understand it's ungrammatical (I may be influenced by living with an American). But to me it surely is better than double sich. Edit: Actually, dwds lists the reflexive pronoun as optional, so a single sich is perfectly grammatical. Commented Jan 16 at 14:31
  • 1
    Heute ist ein schöner Tag, an dem es sich lohnt, sich ans sich erinnern zu erinnern.
    – bakunin
    Commented Jan 16 at 19:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.