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Questions tagged [colloquial]

Umgangssprache - An expression is colloquial if it is rarely used in public speeches or in formal writing, but often in informal speech, e.g. among friends.

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7
votes
4answers
212 views

How to understand „von wegen“ meaning?

I'm reading Ahoi aus Hamburg (a graded reader for German learners) and it says that the expression “Von wegen Venedig!”* means "So much for Venice!", and from other sites I see translations for "von ...
2
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2answers
258 views

Gehn ma Tauben vergiften im Park

"Gehn ma Tauben vergiften im Park?" I do not understand the words "gehn" and "ma" and also how the infinitive "vergiften" is used in the above sentence.
4
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4answers
1k views

Leaving out pronouns in informal conversation

I've seen a few simple sentences leave out an "ich" and go straight to the verb, particularly in very informal conversation or for stylistic reasons. Here are some examples that come to mind: In the ...
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4answers
140 views

How do you say “it was nothing more than that” in German?

In English we frequently "that's all" to indicate something was not more than something another person fears that it is. I'm finding it very hard to even find the right keywords to search for a ...
4
votes
3answers
138 views

When to use ebenso instead of auch?

Are ebenso and auch frequently interchangeable? Or are there nuances to their meaning I should be aware of, especially as to which word is preferred by modern German natives in their speech? For ...
10
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6answers
4k views

How do you say “half the time …, the other half …” in German?

I am looking for a way to say in German the equivalent of "half the time …, the other half …" but when it's used in a very specific, colloquial context in English. For example: Joan: So how are ...
0
votes
4answers
286 views

“Bitte heißen mir A” oder “Bitte heißen mich A”?

When I want someone to call me by a certain name or title (e.g. "A"), which should I use, "Bitte heißen mir A." or "Bitte heißen mich A."? Can also you provide some other ways to make such a ...
3
votes
1answer
118 views

What is the difference between notwendig and erforderlich?

In the song Vor Gericht by Alligatoah is this lyric: "Gewalt ist zum Zerstören nicht erforderlich" (Violence is not necessary to cause destruction" My two questions about this sentence relate to the ...
4
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2answers
136 views

Wilhelm II. und Ludwig XIV

Ich habe gerade in Volker Kutschers »Der nasse Fisch«, oder vielleicht sollte ich in Volker Kutschers »Nassem Fisch« schreiben, den folgenden Satz gelesen : Der Mann erinnerte ein wenig an Wilhelm ...
7
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2answers
157 views

Zusammenhang zwischen “Rappen” und “berappen”?

Hat denn die kleinste schweizerische Währungseinheit "der Rappen" etwas mit dem Verb "berappen" (ugs. für bezahlen) zu tun? Ich finde für beide Wörter sehr vage und auch teilweise stark voneinander ...
1
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1answer
73 views

Ways to ask for opinions over subjects/items/events

In english if I want to ask for someone's opinion of a movie or event I would ask What did you think of [insert topic]? or I would ask How did you find the [insert topic]? In German I was ...
12
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4answers
4k views

How do native German speakers usually express skepticism (using even) about a premise?

In English when we express skepticism about a premise we frequently use a phrase that starts with the word "even". For example: Joe: Do you know the band named Rammstein? Dietrich: Everyone ...
7
votes
5answers
301 views

Der Song vs. Das Lied?

I have always seen das Lied used to refer to a "song" in my beginner German texts. However, whenever I use one of the online translators, they always use "der Song". Is there any difference in usage,...
4
votes
1answer
100 views

How is the colloquial “One moment X, and the next Y” commonly expressed in German?

In conversation, I just said: Die reinste Folter. Da wähnt man sich als glorreicher Sieger und erliegt dann einer unerwarteten Verletzung... We were talking about how arduous it must be for top ...
8
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5answers
289 views

How is the colloquial “I don't miss those days” commonly expressed in German?

In conversation, I just said jokingly: Ja, den schlafmangelerfüllten Assistenzarzt-Tagen weine ich keine Träne nach. Wir waren immer kurz davor, sogar im Dienst stehend einzuschlafen... ...
20
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6answers
5k views

What would be the way to say “just saying” in German? (Not the literal translation)

The context would be when making a suggestion. For example, if I am with a group of friends and everyone is hungry I could say: "There is a restaurant nearby. Just saying." If me and some friends ...
24
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4answers
5k views

When speaking, how do you change your mind mid-sentence?

Imagine that you're saying something, but then realise you want to say something else instead. In English, you might say: I don't like ice cream, because— actually, no. I like chocolate ice cream, ...
2
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4answers
132 views

Is “de” really a common substitute for “der,” “die,” and “das” in colloquial speech?

In this article, Matt Crossman of Thrillist claims to have been told the following by a German journalist: [he] told me that even Germans don’t how to use der, die, das, so they just cheat and say ...
5
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1answer
167 views

Why do we need “uns mal” in the sentence “maybe we can meet for a meal”?

If I write a sentence as: "Vielleicht können wir zu einem Essen treffen", it would mean exactly the same as the sentence: "Vielleicht können uns mal wir zu einem Essen treffen" as per the google ...
6
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5answers
481 views

Jemand eine kleben - was ist die „eine“?

Ich kenne den Ausdruck jemand eine kleben als umgangssprachlichen Begriff für eine Ohrfeige verteilen. Pass bloß auf, ich kleb' dir gleich eine! In den einschlägigen Wörterbüchern (Grimm, DWDS) ...
6
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2answers
251 views

“Guten” instead of “Guten Appetit”?

Am I going insane, or are people just saying "Guten" whenever I whip out food? To be more specific: Do people say "Guten" as an abbreviation for "Guten Appetit"? If yes, is it interchangeable with ...
11
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9answers
4k views

Is there an expression that translates to “building character” in German?

My friend and I were out in the rain, and I was asked why I left my stuffed animal keychain clipped to my backpack if it will get wet. I wanted to reply with an offhand joke about how being out in the ...
3
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2answers
224 views

Is there a German banter site?

I'm looking for something like https://www.viedemerde.fr, but in German: full of colloquial usage, swear words, rudeness and banter. It doesn't have to be a website, it can also be a Twitter account ...
6
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3answers
247 views

Erzählt mir doch nich, dasset nich jeht!

I have seen this sentence on FB. I looked it up and it turned to be a book title. However, I couldn't understand what it means. nich could mean nicht, jeht could be geht?!, dasset according to google ...
7
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3answers
821 views

What colloquialisms can be used to refer to a friend?

Can somebody please help me translate the phrase "What's up Homeboy" into German? I am getting mixed results with various computer-generated translations. I feel like these translations would not ...
4
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2answers
192 views

Why is it just “werden” and not “werden sein”?

Ich habe den nächsten Satz in einer Geschichte gefunden. Er kommt in einer Partyeinladung vor. Gefeiert wird beim nächsten Vollmond auf X Island. Dieser Satz ist jedoch nicht der Einzige dieser ...
11
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1answer
938 views

What does “Haba Dere Gibt´s a Bier” mean?

I've seen Haba Dere Gibt´s a Bier on t-shirts but can't find a translation. Thanks
3
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1answer
237 views

NSFW - German Equivalent

I am looking for, if it even exists, the German equivalent of the English NSFW (not safe for work) abbreviation. Edit: The NSFW abbreviation pertains to resources on the web you better not visit ...
24
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5answers
7k views

Is German on social media very distinct from standard German?

When I read the Germans' writing on Facebook such as when commenting on news by Spiegel or Bild or any other posts, I do not notice a big difference from standard German in terms of spelling or tenses ...
5
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2answers
335 views

What does 'vong' mean?

I have read in a page on Facebook: 'Weng immer noch simgel bimst, demkt dran: Gott schaut vong obem auf dich herab umd demkt sich: Du bimst was gamz besomderes, dich hebe ich mir für besomdere mensch ...
8
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4answers
528 views

Was ist Rotwelsch? What is “Rotwelsch”?

In Diskussionen zur einer kürzlich gestellten Frage wurde deutlich, dass ein Bedarf besteht, den Begriff genauer zu definieren. Ist "Rotwelsch" ein Dialekt des Deutschen oder sogar eine eigene ...
8
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2answers
603 views

Kann man “jemanden kündigen”?

Es ist klar, dass man standardsprachlich jemandem kündigen kann (Dativ). Ich höre aber ab und zu die Form jemanden kündigen (Akkusativ), z.B.: Ich wurde gestern gekündigt. Das läuft gegen mein ...
13
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3answers
258 views

“Einmal” als Zusatz zu einer Bitte in Norddeutschland

Ich komme aus dem Süden und in Norddeutschland ist mir aufgefallen, wie oft dort eine Bitte oder Aufforderung mit dem Wort "einmal" eingeleitet wird: Einmal die Fahrscheine bitte. Einmal bitte ...
21
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6answers
7k views

Is the word “Schwein” necessarily an insult?

I was having private/intimate time with a German lady. And as I started something really special for her (thinking that she would like it), in the heat of the moment, she said: Du bist wirklich ein ...
1
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0answers
32 views

Article with Independent Possessive Pronouns / Artikel mit Possessivpronomen als Nomenvertreter - 'Ist das deine?‘ [duplicate]

I have a question about using Independent Possessive Pronouns. Is it more normal to use 'das' with them regardless of the gender of the item, or should you use the correct definite article or pronoun? ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Verkürzung von “Höker” zu “Hök”

Mir ist die Bezeichnung Hök für einen Händler oder Verkäufer geläufig, meist in Zusammensetzung mit einem für die Branche charakterisierenden Gegenstand, wie zum Beispiel Schraubenhök (...
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Reduktion von Personalpronomen zu Flexionsmorphemen

Ist in der Germanistik die Ansicht verbreitet, dass sich in der gesprochenen Sprache eine alternative Flexion zur direkten Ansprache bspw. aus den Personalpronomen du und Sie entwickelt [hat] oder ...
5
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3answers
124 views

Trennbare Verben: er sieht aus wie… oder er sieht wie… aus

Today in a German course I read: Er sieht aus wie ein Monster. Shouldn't it always be with the separable part in the end? i.e.: Er sieht wie ein Monster aus. In spoken German I hear it quite ...
7
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1answer
348 views

Ich habe kein Problem damit oder Ich habe da kein Problem mit?

Seit einer Zeit suche ich nach einer korrekten Erklärung zu meiner Frage, die beim Hören eigener oder anderer Gespräche enstanden ist. Sehr häufig höre ich die Leute sagen: "Da habe ich kein Problem ...
1
vote
2answers
255 views

Can “Wie interessant!” also be sarcastic?

Does the expression "Wie interessant!" in German always mean concernment and genuine interest, or it can also be interpreted sarcastically, like the English analogue "How interesting!"? If this is ...
2
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1answer
230 views

Kann man in einem E-Mail »Vielen für die Rückmeldung« statt »Vielen Dank für die Rückmeldung« sagen?

Wie schon geschrieben: Kann man einfach: Vielen für die Rückmeldung ohne das Wort Dank sagen? Wird das umgangssprachlich auch auf der Straße benutzt, oder ist das nur in E-Mails erlaubt?
3
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3answers
187 views

“an jemandes Nerven zehren” – or is it “zerren”?

Which of these two verbs is the historically correct one in this phrase? I'm a German living in Germany. The phrase an jemandes Nerven zehren/zerren is often used in modern German and can roughly ...
0
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3answers
15k views

Bitteschön vs. Bitte schön: a reversal in meaning?

At this list of colloquial German terms, "Bitteschön" is defined as "Bedank dich gefälligst bei mir, du ungehobeltes Arschloch!". When I say "Bitte schön" to thank someone, this is obviously not the ...
0
votes
2answers
169 views

What did “black Friday” connote in 1966 Germany?

In a paragraph in a 1966 German book I’m translating, the author on describing the German sense of humor during hard times writes: Unsere Väter muß einigen Spaß vertragen. Im Angesicht von ...
0
votes
2answers
131 views

The colloquial meaning of “… eine weiße Weste …”?

What is the colloquial meaning in post-World War II Allied-occupied Germany of the phrase “... eine weiße Weste ...”? In a 1966 German book I’m translating a paragraph refers to the ‘denazification’ ...
23
votes
10answers
9k views

What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?

When passing crowded areas populated with English speakers, one would usually say "Coming through!" to clear the path; it's not as offensive as "Move away, give me some room", but still is rather ...
4
votes
1answer
268 views

Slang Meanings of Grünes and Weißes?

I was listening to Ufo361, and heard the lyric(s): Ja, du weißt, wo ich wohn' Wo du dein Grünes und dein Weißes holst, jaja Du weißt, wo ich wohn' (ja, du weißt) Wo du dein Grünes und dein Weißes ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

How are “Vati” and “Mutti” used?

I am confused on how Vati and Mutti are used. As I understand it, Vater is used like father in English while Mutter is like mother. So would Vati and Mutti be more of a colloquial thing like mum or ...
1
vote
2answers
247 views

Have nice vacations (or similar)

How do you say "have nice vacations!" when ending a conversation with somebody who is going on vacations? (at work). "Schöner Urlaub"? I'm not sure, this sounds a bit cold / weird (it still has to be ...
13
votes
1answer
2k views

Dialect of a story from the “Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika” (1897)

In an 1897 German cookbook (Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika) I found this story torn out of what may have been a compilation of short stories. The story isn’t dated, but it was included with ...