Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [nominative]

relating to the grammatical case that marks typically the subject of a verb

4
votes
2answers
195 views

Du fehlst mir so sehr

I am confused about the translation of this sentence from Deutsch in English: Deutsch: Du fehlst mir so sehr English: I miss you so much Fehlen is a Dative verb but still the subject (Nominativ) ...
1
vote
3answers
105 views

Dative or nominative?

Can you please tell me which is correct? I can't figure out if it should be dative or nominative: A) Wir fahren von Bonn, die ehemalige Hauptstadt, nach Berlin. B) Wir fahren von Bonn, der ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Gegeben + {<Nominativ> oder <Akkusativ>}?

Which one is correct? Gegeben etwa der Term 1 des Typs Int, dann ist 1+1 ebenso vom Typ Int. Gegeben etwa den Term 1 des Typs Int, dann ist 1+1 ebenso vom Typ Int. Gegeben etwa der Term 1 ...
2
votes
3answers
240 views

Warum schreibt man “Das ist ein riesen Aufwand.”?

Warum schreibt man diesen Satz so: Das ist ein riesen Aufwand Das ist ja Nominative. Aus meiner Sicht sollte das so sein: Das ist ein rieser Aufwand oder Das ist ein riesiger Aufwand ...
5
votes
2answers
106 views

A less widely known occasion for use of the nominative case?

In The Star Beast by Robert Heinlein, published in the early '50s, John Thomas Stuart is a high-school student who keeps an exotic animal named Lummox that his great-great-grandfather brought to Earth ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Clarification on nominative versus accusative in some sentences

I was wondering, in a sentence such as Das Haustier ist ein Hund would ein Hund be nominative or accusative (making it einen)? It seems like it should be accusative because it answers the ...
2
votes
2answers
130 views

Why is the following example in the nominative instead of accusative?

Ich möchte noch Wein. Haben wir noch welchen? Nein, es ist keiner mehr da. I understand why the first part has "welchen" in the accusative, but unsure of the reasoning behind "keiner" being the ...
5
votes
4answers
657 views

Nominative or Accusative case “Sie ist meine Mutter”

In the phrase: Sie ist meine Mutter. 'meine Mutter' is the nominative case although I don't understand why this is so since I naturally think that it should be the accusative case as it receives the ...
0
votes
1answer
228 views

Akkusativ oder Nominativ

Ich habe den folgenden Satz in der Staffel "Friends" gehört: Das ist unser Wagen. Ich glaube, dass es "Das ist unseren Wagen." sein muss. Warum ist es Nominativ hier?
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Dative or nominative in “Die Kindern hängen von Ihrem Vater ab.”

How to understand the following sentence: Die Kindern hängen von Ihrem Vater ab. It sounds like the children depend on their father, right? Sorry, I am a Brazilian student. As I can see it, Die ...
0
votes
2answers
204 views

Akkusativ oder Nominativ an Position 1?

Hier ist eine Verwendung des Akkusatives: Ich habe den Stuhl zum Tisch geschoben. Das Beispiel ist mir völlig klar, aber wenn ich die Reihenfolge der Wörter im Satz ändern möchte, muss ich das ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

“geht” or “geht es”; nominative or accusative?

I want to translate the English sentence "Next weekend doesn't work / won't work" into German. Are either of the following correct German translations, and if so, is one of them preferred? (1) "...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

How to tell subject and predicative apart?

In a recent post, a rule of thumb has been given to tell subject and predicative apart, which, initially, because of both being in nominative, I thought would impossible. Namely: "replace the verb ...
12
votes
1answer
941 views

Are there any other German verbs besides »sein« that take the nominative case?

Most German verbs take accusative object (e.g.: etw. Akk. schreiben). Some take dative object (e.g.: etw. Dat. entsprechen). A small number of verbs require genitive object (e.g.: etw. Gen. bedürfen, ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Which case is the demonstrative pronoun of this sentence?

I want to say the following in German: You can also have a look at the homepage and the "definition phase is over!" page of this google site. The translator has written the following: Du ...
7
votes
2answers
162 views

“Keinen Scanner gefunden” vs. “Kein Scanner gefunden”

Wie im Titel beschrieben geht es um den Fall "Keinen Scanner gefunden" vs. "Kein Scanner gefunden". "Keinen" wäre (glaube ich) Akkusativ, "kein" Nominativ. Nach dem Akkusativ kann mit "Was" und "Wen" ...
4
votes
2answers
372 views

Which one is correct – “dieser Laptop” or “diesen Laptop”?

In the sentence Dieser Laptop gehört mir nicht. Should it be diesen or dieser? I am confused because I would think you would have to use diesen because of gehört, but apparently that's wrong. I ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Why not use Den?

In my textbook I had to make a sentence im Präsens using the verb anfangen and mit der Arbeit. I don't understand that the textbook says it should be Ich fange mit der Arbeit an instead of Ich fange ...
3
votes
2answers
317 views

Ist „existieren“ ein doppelnominativfähiges Verb?

Hier wurde der Doppelakkusativ infrage gestellt. Den Antworten gemäß sollte man vielleicht einfach auch nachvollziehen können, dass es einen Doppelnominativ gäbe. In der Tat sind sein, heißen u.ä. ...