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1

To shed some more light on this question, we can look at other European languages which have kept more cases than German, particularly Slavic ones like Russian. In Russian & Slavic languages, "without" [ohne --> без, bez] is used with the Accusative case, just as in German. This is completely understandable and requires no explanation. &...


2

The case is a property of the nominal phrase itself, as explained in the other answers, however there are restrictions to what cases can appear in a sentence. What cases a German sentence can contain is mostly determined by its predicate (the main verb of the sentence) and the meaning the predicate wants to express. For example, Der Hund isst das Huhn. ...


11

In addition to (or variation of) Jonathan's perfect answer, just because sometimes looking at something from different angles may help getting familiar with it: You seem to come from a language without "cases", therefore the concept is alien to you. Don't be afraid, it is neither difficult, nor is it restricted to German. All indo-european ...


49

You seem to have had a misunderstanding about what case is. Case is not an attribute of a sentence, but the attribute of a noun phrase, which is a part of a sentence. This is the analysis of your example sentence (be aware of spelling, your original sentence is flawed regarding capitalization). The square brackets mark the boundaries of the noun phrases. ...


1

Dativ comes from Latin (casus) dativus (means "given") which was used to denote the receiver. Akkusativ comes from Latin casus accusativus (means "case relating to the indictment") which was used to mark the direct object. A speculation by me is "with" had been understood as "with the given one", and "without"...


0

ohne Even the Old High German variations »anu«, »ano« and »ana« (used in 8th century) were used with accusative case. Some etymologists say, that in even earlier times it also was used together with genitive and dative case, but I couldn't find any sources for it. mit The word »mit« on the other hand seems to be in use with dative case since it exists, which ...


2

There is indication that ohne used to be linked also to the dative (and genitive) case. In the etymology section for the entry ohne at the DWDS, Wolfgang Pfeifer writes: In präpositionaler Verwendung verlangt ohne, das seit dem Ahd. sowohl ‘nicht versehen mit’ als auch ‘außer, ausgenommen’ sein kann, von Anfang an den Akkusativ, doch ist in älterer Zeit ...


-2

There is no logic in grammar as you can clearly see by the dative case in German while almost every similar sentence in English would require accusative. Language is not Mathematics. It's art not science.


1

Der genau Buchtitel lautet nicht »zwischen du und ich«. Den Titel so zu schreiben wäre falsch, denn diese Schreibweise behauptet unmissverständlich: »Alle Wörter werden kleingeschrieben!« was in weiterer Folge bedeutet: »Keines der Wörter ist ein Substantiv!« Und genau das ist falsch. Die Groß-/Kleinschreibung sollte man in der deutschen Sprache sehr ernst ...


8

Alle Regeln, die du zitierst, sind richtig. Dir scheint nur nicht klar zu sein, wie sie hier anzuwenden sind. Es stimmt, dass man für Richtungen in der Regel den Akkusativ verwendet, und für Orte in der Regel den Dativ. Diese Regel lässt sich auch auf zwischen anwenden: (Dabei ist es gleichgültig, ob Nomen oder Pronomen mit zwischen verbunden werden). ...


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