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1

Welcome to German SE! This has already been answered pretty well in the comments, but I'll add an actual answer for good form. Yes, you did correctly identify the accusative object "the pen" and the dative object "her". This can be confusing for English speakers learning German because English does not really distinguish between these ...


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This topic is covered by the Duden grammar under sections 335 and 1530. Luckily, the author of the relevant sections, Peter Gallmann, has some publicly available lecture notes on the subject: Nomen, Kasusflexion: Die Unterlassungsregel. What is observed is the syntactically conditioned dropping of the weak masculine singular ending ‑(e)n: ein Orchester ohne ...


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The phrase »Benutzername(n) kopieren« is an ellipsis, i.e. a fragment of a sentence. The whole sentence might be something like this: Ich möchte den Benutzername(n) kopieren. Now we have a complete sentence, and only now we can analyze it, because grammar is the science of arranging and modifying words to create sentences. Grammar is not the science of ...


2

In this case, it's not the accusative, but the genitive (Wessen Behebung? or Behebung wessen?). That's the reason why ein changed into eines (note that Fehler needs to transform into Fehlers for this => "Behebung eines kleinen Fehlers"). Note, that this sentence uses the Nominalstil (nominal style), it transforms the verb (beheben) into a noun (...


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