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3

I would like to add the perspective of a native speaker with a few examples. The key part of the confusing nature of "Guter Mann" is the adjective "gut". In general, obviously, "gut" is a positive adjective. However, when this positive adjective would not really be required in a sentence, choosing to use it anyway puts a ...


5

Great answers so far, one meaning I heard is as a compliment: Guter Mann! I think the english equivalent is: Attaboy!


12

When used to address someone directly (vocative usage) German has no distinct grammatical case for addresses, but other languages (like Latin) have a vocative case. In German and most other languages (like English too) we just use a name, role or title (which is a noun) and put an adjective in front of it. In written texts we add a comma, and then we add the ...


13

The meaning of "guter Mann" depends on the context - it may have a positive or a negative connotation. If you talk about somebody and say "er ist ein guter Mann", then it has the obvious positive meaning. In the phrase "guter Mann, bitte sagen Sie mir Ihren Namen" it is directly addressed to somebody and it has a negative ...


6

This is usually used in a somewhat sarcastic way — mostly if you are annoyed — to address or refer to a male person. The policemen is sure to be annoyed because this man won't tell him his name. Your colleague might have been annoyed too, but it really depends on the context and situation. Note that "guter Mann" would not be considered pejorative ...


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