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2

You are mixing up parts of speech and grammatical functions. A word belongs to a certain part of speech, even if it stands alone, i.e. if it's not part of a sentence, for example when it's listed in a dictionary. »Der« is an article, »Mann« is a noun, »essen« is a verb, »schön« is an adjective etc. But in sentences words or groups of words have grammatical ...


2

Grammatically, you can generally use adjectives as adverbs, too. A different question is whether the adjective is suitable to provide information that fits the verb you are using -- or any verb. As RDBury pointed out, there are adjectives like "sonstig" that just don't make sense as adverbs. Examples for uses of inopportun and unangebracht as ...


1

I think the root problem here is not with auch, but with the exact meaning of wie. Namely, that there is a subtle change in stress between wie and "like". Focusing on the auch side has caused everyone (including me) to push the rope instead of pulling it. But, as Dodezv pointed out in his answer, the auch at the end syntax seems to only occur with ...


3

Firstly, auch in this position appears only with wie, so it is only natural that there is no own dictionary entry in auch, as wie auch has to be understood as a single unit. The meaning is most certainly too, as the other answers stated. As to why it is behind the noun: The most logical explanation I can think of is a shortening of Das Wochenende ist für ...


1

The meaning of auch here is simply too or also. In German, words like auch or noch are used quite a lot more often than in English. So often auch is simply not translated. Another example: Wer riskiert, kann auch verlieren. which may be translated to: He who takes risks can lose. The auch here means also in the sense of He who takes risks can [not only ...


2

English »just like any other« is in German »genauso wie jede(r|s) andere« (without »auch«). And German »wie ... auch« is in English »like ... too«. The German word »auch« simply can be translated into the English »too«: Das Wochenende ist wie jeder andere Tag auch. The weekend is like any other day too. It's optional in this construction: Das Wochenende ...


0

Beide Sätze sind richtig. Die Bedeutung ist nur ganz leicht unterschiedlich. Das liegt nämlich daran, was als erstes erwähnt wird. Das Wichtige wird meistens zuerst erwähnt. Das würde man beim Aussprechen erkennen, je nach Betonung. Im ersten Satz wird der Fokus eher auf "Ferien" gelegt. Die Ferien beginnen heute, wie schön, endlich kein ...


2

All in all, the sentence is lacking both in language and in meaning. A verb is missing. "nur noch nur" is sloppy language at best. It doesn't seem entirely wrong to me, but I wouldn't use it. A more common and precise way to express the same notion would be "nur noch ausschließlich über Skype". What it means is that "{nur/...


5

First, this sentence no verb ;) It should probably be something like Werden die Menschen Arztbesuche demnächst nur noch nur über Skype erledigen? But that isn't related to the double "nur". To get a better grip of the sentence, let's take it apart. Die Menschen werden Arztbesuche über Skype erledigen. No "nur" so far, and not a ...


1

Why is it written like that? Is the second "nur" redundant? In general, it is not redundant. The two occurrences of "nur" refer to different parts of the sentence. As was correctly pointed out in the comments, your sentences is lacking a verb. As suggested by a commenter, "durchgeführt" ist a fitting verb to complete the ...


1

"nur noch" is a fixed expression which is frequently used in German. Its meaning varies between only : Ich muss nur noch eine E-Mail berantworten. nothing else than : Ich habe nur noch Schwierigkeiten. exclusively : Ich werde ab jetzt nur noch mit FFP2-Maske einkaufen gehen.


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