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40 votes

How to say "I can read that book in one day" (stressing one)

To stress one day you can say Ich kann das Buch an einem einzigen Tag lesen.
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31 votes

Why is the sentence "Das ist eine Nase" correct?

In German language, the word "das" is not only an article. It has a second meaning: It can also have the meanings of the English words "this" or "that". If the word "das" means "this", there are no ...
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27 votes
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Is the word "Unterlagen" masculine or feminine?

The das in the first example is not an article since an article would have to come just before a noun. It's a demonstrative pronoun roughly translatable as "that", although "this/these&...
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26 votes
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Ist es unhöflich, Vornamen mit Artikel zu erwähnen?

Since the link was broken, the new link to the results of the Atlas zur Deutschen Alltäglichen Sprache, respective 9th round is:
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  • 30.4k
26 votes
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Why are there two articles in front of a noun?

The referent of the masculine dative relative pronoun dem is Erwerb and der is a feminine genitive article for Erstsprache. … dass der Erwerb der Zweitsprache im Prinzip dem [Erwerb] der ...
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26 votes
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Use of das vs die in a sentence

Das may look like an article meaning the in this context - But it isn't. Der, die, das can actually cover three functions: Article - That is what you seem to be concentrating on Relative Pronoun - ...
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22 votes
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Two real articles before a noun – why?

Einen in the example sentence is not an article, it is part of an idiomatic expression. The respective part of the sentence can be translated to: that they placed at that specific gable In ...
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  • 8,679
21 votes
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Where don't we use an article with God

My perception as a native speaker of German is that "Gott" can be used as a normal noun (in that case, it appears with an article), or like a name (in that case, it appears without an article). The ...
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  • 8,068
19 votes
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SPD-Slogan „Das WIR entscheidet“

Du bist (vermutlich) über einen Rechtschreibfehler gestolpert (gemäß § 57 (3) der Rechtschreibregeln). Eigentlich müsste da stehen: ein Land, in dem das Wir entscheidet Wir ist hier ein ...
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  • 21.5k
18 votes

How to say "I can read that book in one day" (stressing one)

With Ich kann das Buch an einem Tag lesen. you already express that you can read the whole book within one day. Depending on the context there might be rare cases where you want to eliminate any ...
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  • 1,337
18 votes
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In the sentence "Ich begegnete einem alten Freund in Berlin", why the dative einem instead of the accusative einen?

There is a broad rule of thumb to translate English direct objects to German Akkusativ objects and English indirect objects to German Dativ objects, but it's no more than that, a rule of thumb. There ...
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  • 16.5k
17 votes
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How to say "I can read that book in one day" (stressing one)

in The shortest variant would be using the temporal preposition in instead of an, as you already found out. In this usage in already implies that something happens within the time span further ...
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  • 69.8k
17 votes

What definite/indefinite article do Germans use when they don't know/forget the noun they're talking about?

Very often you have a vague idea of what you want to say, and with this idea often comes some words that have similar meanings, but still are not exactly what you want to say. So you often use their ...
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16 votes

Where don't we use an article with God

This answer goes along the same lines as O. R. Mapper’s, but is too much for comments. If you so wish, the word Gott can have two meanings (see also the Duden): God – the single god in a monotheistic ...
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  • 21.5k
16 votes

»The Hague« in English = »Den Haag« in German. Why not »Der Haag« or »Das Haag«?

We simply use the Dutch name of that city and don't translate it into German - And that happens to be Den Haag. The fact that this looks like "den", the accusative of "der" is pure coincidence (or ...
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  • 57.2k
16 votes

Would combining all German articles to just one article have a real negative effect on the language?

In cases where the article is nominative and just there to define the gender of the noun: Yes, there would be very small effects to the language. But as stated in the comments: Some times the article ...
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  • 8,679
16 votes
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Hat die Verwendung des bestimmten Artikels in "die Ukraine" eine politische Konnotation?

Länderbezeichnungen sind uneinheitlich. In den meisten Fällen wird kein Artikel vorangestellt, aber es gibt die Ukraine die Schweiz die Slowakei die Türkei die Mongolei der Iran der Irak Eine ...
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15 votes

Sign of the Cross – case of “Im Namen”

The preposition in in German always governs two cases, meaning it can take both the accusative and the dative cases, but not all at once, of course. As a general rule, in + accusative is used when ...
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15 votes
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die einen (at the beginning of a sentence)

In spoken language it is sometimes hard to hear the clear borders of sentences. And spoken / colloquial language does not always follow grammatical rules. You heard the part with "die einen...&...
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  • 8,679
13 votes
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Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?

Wie schon anderswo erklärt, kann „danken“ ein Dativ- und ein Akkusativobjekt haben, um auszudrücken, wem und wofür gedankt wird. Dort wo wir heute den Akkusativ benutzen, wurde laut Grimm (Punkt 3) im ...
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  • 19k
13 votes
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Why is there no article in "Auf grüner Linde"?

One of the most obvious reasons (to me) why Heine left out the article there is verse meter. The poem follows a 4-3-4-3 pattern of emphasised syllables per line. Thus, auf grüner Linde sitzt und singt ...
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  • 38k
13 votes
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Can the noun »Süße« be neuter?

Because here, das Süße, is a nominalization ("Substantivierung") of the adjective süß, which in principle can have any article. There can be two reasons (thanks to @KilianFoth for pointing out one ...
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  • 3,138
13 votes

Warum kann man sagen: "Ist Abtreibung Mord?"?

Nein, damit sind keine abzählbaren Begriffe gemeint. Abzählen könnte man die Morde, die z.B. Jack Unterweger begangen hat, oder die Morde, die in einem gewissen Zeitraum in einer bestimmten Region ...
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13 votes
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"An" oder "an dem" bzw. Artikel weglassen

In diesem Fall kann man den Artikel verwenden oder ihn weglassen. Das hängt davon ab, wie man "Arbeitspaket 1" grammatikalisch versteht. Wenn man "Arbeitspaket 1" als Substantiv ...
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12 votes
Accepted

German always needs an article even when refering to general things?

Your word order is a little bit awkward, but the articles are in this case not required in German either: Ich habe im Sommer immer T-Shirt und Jeans an. ... is a perfectly correct sentence. I ...
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  • 2,081
12 votes
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Kann man den Artikel in „zum“ in diesem Satz weglassen?

Die Bedeutung ändert sich nicht, der Satz wird nur grammatikalisch falsch.
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  • 19k
12 votes
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»The Hague« in English = »Den Haag« in German. Why not »Der Haag« or »Das Haag«?

Den Haag is the Dutch name of the city. The den in there is not considered a German accusative masculine definite article (or a German plural dative definite article) but an integral part of the city’...
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  • 38k
12 votes
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Warum sagt man "Wir haben einen Platten" obwohl Platte weiblich oder sächlich ist?

These are two different things. Wir haben eine Platte. We have a plate/disc/record. Die Platte is a shortening from die Langspielplatte, a 33rpm long play record, as opposed to the older 78rpm ...
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