58

"Ich möchte" doesn't really correspond to "I want", but more to something like "I would like...". "I want" would be more something like "ich will", and that would actually be too demanding in a restaurant situation in my opinion. Using "ich möchte" in a situation like that may be on the more ...


11

"Ich möchte" is perceived as a more polite form of "ich will", so translating both to "I want" will lose important nuance and arguably be wrong. Grammatically, "ich möchte" is Konjunktiv II of "ich mag", as you can see by checking a suitable dictionary. (Even though I think that it is mostly perceived as a ...


9

"Ich möchte" does not translate as "I want". It means that you have a wish, not a demand. To a waiter you would typically say "Ich möchte bitte das Steak" which is a bit more polite than "Ich möchte das Steak". Already young children are taught the distinction between "ich möchte" and "ich will". ...


4

Je nachdem, ob das mit dem Superlativ Bezeichnete im Singular oder im Plural steht, wird derjenige Artikel verwendet, den das Substantiv im Singular oder im Plural hätte. Zum Beispiel: der größte aller Berge (der Berg) die größte aller Partys (die Party) das größte aller Kinder (das Kind) die größten aller Kinder (die Kinder)


3

Firstly, auch in this position appears only with wie, so it is only natural that there is no own dictionary entry in auch, as wie auch has to be understood as a single unit. The meaning is most certainly too, as the other answers stated. As to why it is behind the noun: The most logical explanation I can think of is a shortening of Das Wochenende ist für ...


3

The wonderful resource Atlas der deutschen Alltagssprache asked about how an unemphasised nicht is pronounced in everyday speech and aggregated the result to give the following map: As you can see, Germany is essentially North/South split on this pronunciation (like many others). Net and its cousins nit, ned, niad, nidda, nöd and it can be heard all across ...


2

English »just like any other« is in German »genauso wie jede(r|s) andere« (without »auch«). And German »wie ... auch« is in English »like ... too«. The German word »auch« simply can be translated into the English »too«: Das Wochenende ist wie jeder andere Tag auch. The weekend is like any other day too. It's optional in this construction: Das Wochenende ...


2

Hier muss man beachten, dass ein Wort ausgelassen ist. Vollständig (oder fast schon übervollständig) lautet der Satz: Ihre Tochter ist das größte Kind von allen Kindern in der Klasse. Da "Kind", beziehungsweise "Kinder", aber danach genannt wird, wird es oft beim ersten Mal weggelassen und heißt dann: Ihre Tochter ist das größte von ...


1

I think the root problem here is not with auch, but with the exact meaning of wie. Namely, that there is a subtle change in stress between wie and "like". Focusing on the auch side has caused everyone (including me) to push the rope instead of pulling it. But, as Dodezv pointed out in his answer, the auch at the end syntax seems to only occur with ...


1

The meaning of auch here is simply too or also. In German, words like auch or noch are used quite a lot more often than in English. So often auch is simply not translated. Another example: Wer riskiert, kann auch verlieren. which may be translated to: He who takes risks can lose. The auch here means also in the sense of He who takes risks can [not only ...


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