24

I don't know what the exact context around that sentence was, I think in this case it's relevant to know what he wanted to express. You're right, usually you would say sondern in this case, for "correcting" the word used before (exponential). However, it might be that he wanted to stress that there is an increase, not exponential, but still linear. ...


20

First, your example would be translated as “Ich weiß, dass du gut tanzt” (verb in the end in a dass… sub clause). If you want to express doubt about something, you put the nicht with the weiß, just like in English: “I do not know if I can come tomorrow” is “Ich weiß nicht, ob ich morgen kommen kann”. Like you assumed, if is used (ob in German), cause that ...


19

The general form in German is Ich weiß, dass ... The opposite would be Ich weiß nicht, ob ... I'm going to elaborate on the comment I gave yesterday a bit to make clearer why wenn is not an option here: According to the dictionaries, the English if can be translated (among others) as wenn, falls or ob in German, but just like it is not always ...


16

Here is a helpful example of when you can use "denn" but "weil" doesn't really make sense: Er muss müde sein, denn er trinkt viel Kaffee. "He must be tired, because / seeing as he is drinking a lot of coffee." versus Er muss müde sein, weil er viel Kaffee trinkt. "He must be tired, because / reason being he is drinking coffee." "Weil" implies ...


14

Rein formal ist der Satz korrekt. Der Nebensatz »dass wir uns in diesem Punkt einig sind« ist ein Zwischensatz, der in den übergeordneten Satz eingebettet ist und dort die Rolle des Subjekts einnimmt (Subjektsatz). Da der übergeordnete Satz selbst ein dass-Satz ist, hat das zur Folge, dass die Einleitewörter – in beiden Fällen: dass – der beiden Sätze ...


14

The explanation that you are giving for the difference between "aber" and "sondern" sounds very good to me as a native German speaker. What I can add is: „nicht [a], sondern [b]”: means [a] is not the case, but [b] is the case. Contrary to [a]. (a sidenote: as a German speaker I find it weird somehow when other languages use the word ...


13

Agreeing with thekeyofgb's comment, it is not apparent that they are similar. But in used in their right place, they convey the same effect: Er war krank. Trotzdem ging er zur Arbeit. Obwohl er krank war, ging er zur Arbeit. There is a third (at least) possibility trotz+(Genitiv) (with Dativ is used in Switzerland more often) Trotz seiner Krankheit ging ...


13

Let’s start off with the three following simple examples: Er betätigte zwei Tasten, sodass der Alarm ausgelöst wurde. Er betätigte zwei Tasten so, dass der Alarm ausgelöste wurde. Er betätigte zwei Tasten, so, dass der Alarm ausgelöste wurde. In the first example, him pressing two keys causes the alarm; it does not matter which keys he pressed or how....


13

Man setzt vor wie wenn ein Komma. Siehe § 74 E1.


12

In general you use da- compounds to talk about something you've already mentioned instead of using the complete noun or using prep + es. That's why "wir sprechen über es" has <2000 Google hits while "wir sprechen darüber" has >200,000. Heute benötigt ihr dieses Buch. Wir sprechen darüber. Ich kann das Handy nicht finden. Ich suche ...


11

§ 74 E1 der Rechtschreibregeln lautet: E1: Besteht die Einleitung eines Nebensatzes aus einem Einleitewort und weiteren Wörtern, so gilt: (1) Man setzt das Komma vor die ganze Wortgruppe: […] Sie rannte, wie wenn es um ihr Leben ginge. […] Hier wird explizit der gleiche Fall als Beispiel genutzt. Ein Komma vor wie (und nur dort) ist also auf ...


11

Die Kombinationen klingen tatsächlich ziemlich holprig, was hauptsächlich an dem daraus folgenden Satzbau liegt. Die Beispielsätze kann man aber einfach umstellen: Du glaubst doch nicht, dass du heute Abend weggehen kannst, wenn du nicht mithilfst. Wir müssen den Termin halten, weil das unser letzter Auftrag war, wenn wir das nicht schaffen.


11

Learn: There is no "natural breath" rule for commas in German grammar! Forget any physiological functions of your body when you think about German grammar! These are two fields of knowledge, that have absolutely nothing to do with each other. For the placement of commas there are grammatical rules (most of them are very strict, but there are also ...


11

For years in the range 1100 to 1999 the "zwölfhundert" variant is common in Germany: The house was built in the year 1980. Das Haus wurde im Jahr neunzehnhundertachtzig gebaut. The variant "tausendzweihundert" is very, very uncommon for years in that range. The variant "zwölfhundert" sometimes is used for other things but it ...


11

1) As substantive Orangen has to start with a capital letter. This is an error. 2) The difference between mag Orangen nicht und mag keine Orangen is between minor to non-existing. If find the keine variant somewhat nicer, but this can't be the reason for a rejection.


10

The same distinction exists between for/because in English. "Denn" corresponds exactly in function and meaning to the archaic English conjunction "for", which was common in early modern English: "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth." "Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do." "...


10

First, your grammar, in particular your word order is correct. But I think that the meaning of the second sentence is not what you thought. The first is ok. A, obwohl B means that both A and B are true, and it points out that in particular B did not prevent A from being true, even though it should in general, or one might think that it does, or it ...


10

Oh, you realize that each of you used two clauses? One main clause (V2 = verb in 2nd position), one subordinate clause (verb at the end): [Ich hoffe], dass [ihr einen schönen Tag habt]. So to clear up your case confusion, we consider the second clause only: The pronoun ihr is the subject, hence nominative. The verb follows the subject, i.e. 2nd plural = ...


10

Mathematicians usually say /zoˈdas/ in this context, i.e., they put the stress on "dass", pronounce "so" with a short vowel, and don't make any pause between /zo/ and /das/. That means that they use the conjunction "sodass", which can also be written as "so dass" according to the official spelling rules. In this case, ...


10

Beim Vergleich mit der Version aus der 1984er Lutherbibel wird klar, dass noch in diesem Satz wie eine Konjunktion gebraucht wird. Wie wir Grimms Wörterbuch entnehmen können, war die Konjunktion noch tatsächlich früher in weitaus mehr Varianten im Gebrauch als heute. Speziell zu der hier angefragten Konstellation schreiben sie in Abschnitt 3aβ: noch vor ...


10

Grundsatz Wenn die Grundregel lautet, dass der mit als eingebundene Satzteil im selben Kasus steht wie das Bezugswort, dann wäre das erste Beispiel korrekt: Darf ich Ihnen als Experten eine Frage stellen? Soll sich der Satzteil „als Experte(n)“ auf „Ihnen“, also dem Personalpronomen im Dativ beziehen, dann muss m.E. auch „Experte“ im Dativ stehen. ...


10

Weil is because, wegen is because of. Example for because; Warum ist der Boden nass? (Why is the floor wet?) Weil es geregnet hat. (because it rained.) Example for because of Warum bleiben Sie zu Hause? (Why do you stay at home?) Wegen des schlechten Wetters. (Because of the bad weather.) The usage of these words is not limited to these meanings and ...


10

That depends. Usually, when you see dass, it just introduces a complement clause (Komplementsatz): Er hat Angst, dass sie ihn verlässt. Having lost much of its semantic value, it doesn't really fall into either of your categories. However, occasionally, this standard use is referred to as "neutral" (e.g. by Duden-Grammatik, if I remember correctly; ...


9

A und c sind möglich. B dagegen setzt voraus, dass die Subjekte verschieden sind, was mit Tom und er nicht gegeben ist. Die verschiedenen Positionen von aber haben verschiedene Bedeutungen: in "..., aber er muss..." und "..., er muss aber" bezieht sich das aber auf das, was er muss (in c ist diese Bedeutung etwas stärker als in a) Er möchte gerne ...


9

The second one is correct. Here, bis auf is a synonym for außer (engl. except). außer dass is a compound conjunction, and so does bis auf dass. All of them are part of the subordinate clause and that is why there is no comma that separates. Read more about it also here. The first sentence is wrong because you use das as synonym for welches but which is not ...


9

They are not completely interchangable. It depends on your intention as speaker: in some contexts constructions with „wenn“ bear a temporal and a conditional intention (mostly both), while „falls“ is reduced to the conditional. Please consider following examples: Wenn ich zurück komme, heiraten wir. vs. Falls ich zurück komme, heiraten wir. The ...


9

The German translation of because then is actually pretty simple: weil… dann (or less common: denn dann). You can rephrase the first sentence like this to make the causal relationship more apparent: Flugtickets kaufen wir am liebsten im Internet, weil wir dann die Preise vergleichen können. or Flugtickets kaufen wir am liebsten im Internet, denn dann ...


9

Daher is an adverb, that roughly means "therefore." Thus, it occupies the first spot in the second sentence, and sends the verb to the second spot. "Ich bin ein Vegetarier; daher esse ich kein Fleisch" is correct. Daher is not a subordinating conjunction that sends the verb to the end. Nor is it a coordinating conjunction, which would allow you to keep ...


9

Your confusion likely lies in the fact that there are two words damit that have different grammatical functions. One of the two is the conjunction damit, introducing a final subordinate clause, i.e. the subordinate clause signifies the goals of an action. As in any subordinate clause (Nebensatz), the verb is placed last therein. Ich lese den Roman, damit ...


9

Your teacher is wrong. Your sentences are more correct than Ich ärgere mich, dass ich nichts kaufen kann. Weil die Geschäfte geschlossen sind. The latter is actually grammatically flawed. However, it might be used to emphasize the importance of the last subclause. But this is rather the sort of language you would expect either in a novel or in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible