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3

There is no need to get creative here: Liebe (Großtante[1]) <her first name>, <content of the letter> <some good wishes> Deine Linda [1] Optional but has the advantage of clarifying your relationship immediately, needs to be adjusted to the actual relationship. I actually called my great-aunts "Tante <name>" and I think ...


2

I have a similar background and like to send postcards to my relative. I generally open with „Liebe(r) [Name],“ as it is a pretty standard opening for personal letters. You can use it for friends and even acquaintances. It’s analogous to “Dear [Name],” in English; it’s not used in professional settings, but it adds enough decorum that it doesn’t feel too ...


2

Kurzfassung Kein Dialekt (keine Mundart) kein Alltagsdeutsch (keine Umgangssprache) ca. 150 Jahre altes Standarddeutsch (überregional normierte Dachsprache) im Detail Das deutsche Wörterbuch der Gebrüder Grimm (das auch »der Grimm« genannt wird) wurde von den beiden Sprachwissenschaftlern und Volkskundlern Jacob und Wilhelm Grimm verfasst. Jacob Grimm: ...


1

This page has a number of words that are not in high German (page is in German) https://www.deine-woerter.de/lexikon/hessen/ Here are some that I know from growing up: "aijereggisch" - egg-shaped, literally: egg-corner-ish "babbele" - to talk, chat "beleidischd Lebberworscht" - someone being/ playing being sad, literally: ...


6

What are some words only used in Hessen? This must not be confused with a question concerning the Hessian pronunciation of commonly known words (for example "Äbbelwoi" for "Apfelwein"). I do not believe that there are many words used exclusively in Hesse. Perhaps Bembel is one of them, but this is certainly known outside Hesse ("...


8

To go a bit into the weeds, there's not the Hessian dialect. There's a group of dialects that are spoken in Hesse (but also in parts of Franconia, Rheinland-Pfalz and Westfalia) that are sometimes summarized as "Hessian dialect". What you hear in the media sometimes, with people like Martin Schneider or Bodo Bach, is mostly a Regiolekt from the ...


8

It started as a comment, but it grew into an answer instead. Typical for the Hessian dialect (not accent) is the shift from /ʃ/ and /ç/ to /ʒ/ as illustrated in Martin Schneider's Aschenbecher example. Within the Hessian dialect, it's also quite common to skip the n in an -en ending and put more emphasis on the (now) final e. Again, this can be heard in the ...


7

Schon DWDS zeigt für Zielstellung unter Bedeutung die synonyme Verwendung von Zielsetzung aber gleichzeitig auch DDR. Die Wortverlaufskurve zeigt einen starken Rückgang in der Zeitspanne kurz vor und nach der Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands. Auch die Stasi Mediathek zeigt eine Vielzahl von Dokumenten mit dem Begriff Zielstellung. Mit einer Google-Suche nach &...


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