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Both are correct sentences with a whole bunch of possible meanings, including some they share. What if he's riding a bike and keeps on crashing into a car? Then shouldn't he learn how to ride around it? Er muss (dann) lernen, um das Auto zu fahren, (statt vor quer dadurch). Try compare calling your mother to calling for your mother. One three letter word and ...


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Talking about a named company like VW or Aldi, you will use the preposition bei: Ich bin Praktikantin bei VW. Ich arbeite bei Aldi als Kassiererin. Er ist Techniker bei der Telekom. If the listener(s) are working in the same company as you, you can say Ich bin hier Praktikantin / Ich arbeite hier als Praktikantin / Ich in hier als Praktikantin eingesetzt. ...


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You are right, the translator is wrong. Your explanations are correct: [...] [W]hile using company, we should always use bei. Note: von would sometimes be an alternative. female intern = eine Praktikantin


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Simply adding it up, with no extra words. Er könnte zum Friseur gehen. Translates as: He could go to the hairdresser. (It is one of his options) He could go to the hairdresser. (He is in dire need of a haircut) Er mag zum Friseur gehen. Translates as: He likes going to the hairdresser. (He enjoys it.) He may go to the hairdresser, (but it won't make him ...


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"Ich muss den Akku meines Handys laden." means to charge it. "Ich muss den Akku meines Handys aufladen." strictly speaking means to load it onto something. Germans use both expressions for the first meaning, because the latter doesn't make any sense, unless you have a real big cellphone battery.


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The development of the German language has been characterised by a weakening of unstressed syllables (Nebensilbenabschwächung). Looking at the 3rd person singular present indicative, Old High German suohhit⁠ – mahhot⁠ – saget became suochet – machet ⁠– saget, with reduction of the vowel to Schwa. Later, the vowel was syncopated, yielding New High German ...


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Same reason why it's "thou shalt not steal" and not "you shall not steal" in English. Just an archaic form of language that's still often used in religious texts.


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Ich habe schon gestern versucht eine Antwort zu formulieren, aber beim Schreiben habe ich bemerkt, dass jeder Versuch irgend ein Kriterium als Unterschied zu benennen darin endet, dass sich dieses Kriterium als nicht haltbar erweist. Ich gebe hier einmal wieder, was meine Recherchen ergeben haben (Alle Zitate aus Wiktionary, Beispiele gekürzt): fürs Erste ...


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The difference is in the case. Rearrange the sentence and you'll get: Ich selbst werde das Buch behalten. This is the nominative case of the personal pronoun ich. In the dative case you have: Mir selbst ist es noch nicht passiert. (It didn't happen to me, yet) and in the accusative case Mich selbst betrifft es nicht. (It doesn't affect myself) I can't ...


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In my humble opinion, this is a question of the speaker's origin. "Dazugeben" is commonly used for all acts of "adding sth. to sth." in Austria. For other German speaking areas, the use of "dazugeben" is limited to recipes and one idiomatic use in: "Seinen Senf dazugeben" a slightly rude way of "adding ones 2 cts&...


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This isn't a complete answer, more tips on how you can research this kind of thing on your own. One thing to try is to compare the results from dict.cc. While dazugeben has two entries "to add" and "to contribute (financially)", hinzufügen has a few more, including "append" and "add on". I think the "contribute ...


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