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6

For most intents and purposes, there is no difference in meaning between (1) and (2). If you want to go down and analyze very closely, variant (2) ("Niemand ...") puts a bit more emphasis on the subject "niemand", while variant (1) ("Es kann uns niemand...") deflects emphasis away from the subject of the sentence, which puts ...


3

"fernzuhalten" ist simply the infinitive with "zu", like for example, "zu gehen". If the verb is separable the "zu" is inserted in between the separable parts. To give another example consider "hineingehen", which become "hineinzugehen". "sein" + the infinitive with "zu" can be ...


8

Das eine ist ein Lehnwort, das andere ein deutsches Wort. Beide Begriffe bezeichnen annähernd dasselbe. Das Wort »Seuche« ist mit dem Verb »siechen« verwandt, welches nichts anderes als »krank sein« bedeutet, aber veraltet ist. »Seuche« und »siechen« stammen vom alhochdeutschen »siuhhī« ab, was »Krankheit« bedeutet. Eine Seuche ist aber nicht einfach nur ...


3

"Wittern" has a concrete meaning and a figurative one. The concrete meaning is overlapping with "Riechen" but the process of perceiving a smell is more active and more subtle/sensitive. And usually it's related to sense the smell of someone or something that poses a (potential) threat or that is a potential prey. The context is usually ...


2

"Wittern" also has a meaning apart from "riechen". But it is taken out of the hunting context. It can also mean something similar to "to have a feeling something is up/wrong". If I am remembering correctly it can also be translated to "smell" in this sense. "Ich wittere Verrat" -> "I smell treason&...


1

I woud say that normally you use “riechen” for humans while “wittern” is mostly used for animals like dogs. "Hunde nehmen Witterung (eines Tieres) auf" "Das riecht aber streng sagt Hans" But it depends a little on the usage/meaning. Like said by @henning-kockerbeck "eine Chance wittern" is a "human usage" for wittern. ...


23

If used verbatim, "wittern" refers more to detecting a smell over a distance. A similar English expression would be "to get wind of something", which also includes the idea of the wind or the air transporting the smell to the nose. "Riechen" is more general. If you for example take a bar of soap in your hand and smell at it, you'...


6

Your impression is partly correct. The meaning of passively "riechen" and "wittern" have a lot of overlap, with "riechen" more in everyday use. "riechen" can occur actively, that something smells, and passively through olfactory receptors. https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/riechen "wittern" is indeed a bit ...


0

Torsten is right, but the following could be added: Using „das“ instead of „es“ (in many instances) is very common in colloquial speech in Northern Germany. It could be that some translation services know about this and some don’t. Google Translate: Das gab ein großes Feuerwerk. = That gave a great fireworks display. Deepl.com: Das gab ein großes ...


0

Others have already said that "das gibt" means a specific condition leads to something and "es gibt" refers to a general situation leading to something. The balloons and a bunch of Kirks are more of a general situation, a picture of confusion and fear of imaginary intruders with bad intentions leading to military starting a preemptive ...


0

Welcome to German SE. For context, this is from the song by Nena, 1983: Jeder war ein großer Krieger Hielten sich für Captain Kirk Das gab ein großes Feuerwerk Keep in mind, that these are song lyrics and you should allow for a certain amount of poetic license and deliberate vagueness. The das used here is a demonstrative pronoun. There is a collection of ...


4

The "das" in the mentioned sentence stands for a result of something. The firework was the result of the events coming before it and that is why "das" is used instead of "es". The sentence Es gab ein großes Feuerwerk is absolutely correct as well and simply states: There was a big firework. The sentence Das gab ein großes ...


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