New answers tagged

2

Ich finde die Frage gut, weil sie Anlaß gibt, über die Rolle von Funktionsverbgefügen nachzudenken. Der Chef brachte die Mitarbeiter in Gefahr. Die Mitarbeiter begaben sich in Gefahr. Die Mitarbeiter gerieten in Gefahr. Es ist klar, daß es in allen drei Fällen um eine Gefährdung der Mitarbeiter geht. Das ist der Bedeutungsbeitrag der Präpositionalphrase in ...


9

einer Sache einen Schub geben Auftrieb würde verstanden werden, aber Auftrieb ist ja v.a. aus der Luftfahrt bekannt. Die Wirtschaft stellt ihre Zahlen oft als Graph dar, wo ein Anstieg etwas Positives bedeutet. Bei Leistung passt der Anstieg nicht so gut, solange man diese nicht in PS misst. Sehr verbreitet ist einen Schub geben. Als Athlet, wenn du ...


5

In Standard German, haben is used as auxiliary verb. In some High German dialects and often in the High German language area in general, however, sein is used.


2

I think that RHa's Die Mannschaft hat zäh gekämpft. is a very good and idiomatic answer. I just would like to add two alternatives: Die Mannschaft hat tapfer gekämpft. Die Mannschaft hat sich teuer verkauft. Both phrases indicate that they had only little chance but still kept on fighting.


3

Another option: "zäh"/"Zähigkeit" (lit. "tough"/"toughness") For example: Die Mannschaft hat zäh gekämpft. Die Mannschaft hat im Spiel große Zähigkeit gezeigt/bewiesen. I would use "Beharrlichkeit" if I wanted to say that the team kept trying to net a goal, even after several unsuccessful attempts.


1

It is always difficult to translate a phrase 100% accurate with all of its meanings and naunces. But there is one that I think fits well in this case. Die Mannschaft hat nie aufgesteckt. (The team never gave up.) It is used when a team has played with everything it has to the end. Mostly in vain because it lost the game (but sometimes as a reason why it ...


2

Maybe what you're looking for are words like "ausdauernd" or "unnachgiebig". Das Team hat ausdauernd gespielt. Also you could exchange "spielen" with "kämpfen" to express the struggle: Das Team hat ausdauernd gekämpft.


5

In addition to the already posted answers I suggest: Ich traue meinen Augen kaum I think it's a bit less used nowadays, but it fits all your examples.


3

(Not no much an answer as a comment that won't fit in the box.) In any language a good portion of the meaning of a sentence is determined by context. So what you have is an example of a sentence in English which might have three different meanings in three different contexts. But there's no reason that there must then be three different German translations; ...


6

Some suggestions: Ich fasse es nicht/ich glaube es nicht! (I can't believe it) Das darf/kann ja wohl nicht wahr sein! (This may not /can not be true) I guess, both exclamations are more typically used in case of a negative surprise. As hinted by @phipsgabler, in case one a sentence more likely to be used is: Das ist unglaublich schön!


5

The same English sentence of all 3 examples can be translated as "Ich kann (es) gar nicht glauben, was ich hier sehe." To express the horror in example 2, "..., was ich hier mitansehen muss.".


3

Both sentences are possible. The second one has two little flaws. 1. Ab morgen werde ich für drei Tage in Urlaub sein. This says that you are going to be on vacation (for three days) starting tomorrow. Ab morgen werde ich [für drei Tage] in Urlaub sein. 2. Ab morgen bin ich in Urlaub für drei Tagen. One would usually say Ab morgen bin ich für drei Tage ...


1

Both sentences are possible (read grammatically) correct, but in my opinion a little awkward. Nevertheless you'd be understood. I would phrase it this way Ich muss mal in meinem Kalender schauen, ... ... was ich vor 3 Tagen gemacht hatte. ... welche Termine ich vor 3 Tagen hatte. ... wo ich vor 3 Tagen war. ... wohin ich vor 3 Tagen gefahren war. ... mit ...


4

If you're specifically asking about the amount of minutes/hours/days/weeks/... you can use: Wie viele Minuten/Stunden/Tage/Wochen sind es noch bis zum Muttertag? If you want to make it less formal, you can also leave out the "sind es", making it Wie viele Minuten/Stunden/Tage/Wochen noch bis zum Muttertag? If you want to make it even less formal (...


0

There are different ways of saying this correctly. "Wie viele Tage sind es noch bis zum Muttertag?" "Wie viele Tage dauert es noch bis zum Muttertag?" It is rather unusual to say: "Wie viele Tage sind noch übrig bis zum Muttertag?" That would be the literal translation of your suggestion: "how many days are left until ...


4

The first thing that came to my mind when reading your question was "Klischee" (as already mentioned by @infinitezero). But as you said cliché is just one aspect of the word trope The word trope has also come to be used for describing commonly recurring literary and rhetorical devices, motifs or clichés in creative works. For example, the "Heroes Journey"...


0

The English word trope is the almost identical to the German word Tropen. This is a technical term and almost no layman is going to understand what you are talking about. People studying literature or film studies (Literatur- or Filmwissenschaft) will. With most of these sentences, Google Translate is going to work well. I didn’t like the movie because they ...


10

We (Germans) would probably use the word Cliché/Klischee or the corresponding adjective klischeehaft, as in Ich mochte den Film, aber dass die Bombe wieder in letzter Sekunde entschärft wurde, war sooo klischeehaft. I enjoyed the movie but that the bomb got defused in the last second was so typical


0

Given your issue with the word “narrative”, I would suggest perhaps the following two books (in English) which focus on giving the reader multiple german synonyms for english words. "A Practical Dictionary of German Usage" by K. B. Beaton – Amazon link here "Dictionary of German Synonyms 3rd Ed" by R. B. Farrell – Amazon link here They might not indeed ...


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