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8

There are already some excellent answers and suggestions given, but per request I'm posting my own. First, the idea of an emotional support animal (ESA) seems to have legal meaning in the USA only. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities, both mental and physical. This is similar to the Civil ...


3

Although you ask for a German version of "ESA" which seems to have a therapeutical context, I suggest Seelenhund (soul dog). This is a dog being in harmony with a person's soul and making feel human beings better. It is not an official term appearing in legal documents, but I think it covers the idea.


5

I suggest Schoßhund even when it is defined in DWDS more as recipient of extended caressing. I would consider it as implied, that there is some emotional benefit on the other side as well. The noun is quite focused on a dog, however, and I see no more generic noun with the same flavour. It is also implied, that the dog is smallish, so it can conveniently ...


4

The English original is already quite clunky? But as the concept catches on slowly in the German speaking world, a direct import for this kind of Assistenzhund* is usually explained as: Emotional Support Animal / Dog Ein Emotional Support Dog (ESD = Unterstützerhund bei emotionalen Unsicherheiten) unterstützt seinen Menschen im Alltag in belastenden ...


1

Verzeihung für die Unannehmlichkeiten = we apologize for any inconveniences.


1

The pronoun nichts means nothing, i.e. nicht etwas. The noun "das Nichts" has a number of quite different meanings. The DWDS entry is enlightening. I'll attempt to come up with an English translation, but it's probably better to read the original. I'll leave it to you to compare to the English use. a) (Philosophy) absolute non-existence, opposite ...


-4

Actually, it occurred to me that the perfect translation would be: Er ist eine Null. In English, "He is a nothing." and "He is a zero." have very similar meanings. DWDS has many examples of this usage.


3

There is a clear distinction in German between a) Es ist nichts and b) es ist ein Nichts with a) meaning the same as the English "it's nothing", while b) would rather mean "void" (like in the great, big void between the stars == das große Nichts zwischen den Sternen) in the sense of the significant absence of anything. If you want to ...


3

This is difficult to answer due to lack of context. It must be clear, which of these two cases applies: the described device is emitting low vibrations which would disturb other devices (then vibrationsarm would be my word of choice) the described device is resilient against vibrations of other sources (phrase suggestions: vibrationsfest, hohe ...


3

I think your translation "In the 19th century, it was ..." sums up what's going on in the German version; just leave out the colon, which doesn't seem necessary anyway. Grammatically, the es here is the "impersonal es" which is used as a subject when there is nothing around that's "doing" whatever it is the verb says is going on....


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