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0

For Wikipedia articles, the anglicism Stub fits best. But it could be translated as: Kurzartikel In general, you could call a place-holder/marker waiting for further development metaphorically Baustelle: Der Text ist noch eine Baustelle. Or you could say: Der Artikel ist unfertig. Both convey the very concept that the current state of the work needs to ...


7

First some technical constraints: The host part (the part between https:// (or http://) and the next slash) is not case sensitive. In this part you can mix uppercase and lowercase letters as you like. So, for your examples this means, that both of these two versions will always work, and you will always reach the very same resource: www.deutscherVerlag.com ...


3

How do you properly capitalize URLs in German? Quite simply: not at all. In print advertising, URLs are usually completely lowercase. There are of course exceptions where the domain name is capitalized in whole or in part, but these are rare. Be careful and ALWAYS write the path part of the URL (domainname.tld/path) in lower case. Alternatively, the server ...


2

The "on the line" part is in Wiktionary (def. 2). "Neck" and "ass" are commonly used representatives for one's personal survival, or one's job or other figurative extension. So the above expressions just combine the two, and I don't think they're a idioms themselves since the the two parts can be translated independently. As ...


5

It seems that Thorsten focused more on the "put your ass on the line" variant in his answer. "put your neck on the line" is mostly translated as seinen Kopf/Hals hinhalten (für etwas) seinen Kopf/Hals riskieren (für etwas) Kopf und Kragen riskieren or - depending on context - figuratively sein Leben (für etwas) aufs Spiel setzen


1

Das deutsche Äquivalent hierfür ist -wie Dir jedes gute Onlinewörterbuch sagt- Sich selbst in die Schusslinie begeben Oder wenn Du beim Pejorativ bleiben willst: seinen Arsch riskieren Beide Beispiele findet man direkt so bei dict. Fürs nächste Mal: Üblicherweise werden hier Fragen, die direkt mit einem Wörterbuch beantwortet werden können direkt und ...


11

Groß (in its literal meaning) indeed indicates great spatial extent, not necessary (only) vertically. It is in its generality the German equivalent to "big". A big rock, a big house etc. will probably be wider but also higher than average. With people though, the meanings of these two words have specialized in opposite ways: In German the literal ...


13

Peter ist groß. This almost exclusively refers to his height. Peter might as well be an XXXL-sized guy, but if you wanted to refer to his weight, you would say something like breit (wide, can also mean he just has wide shoulders), schwer (heavy), dick (large), fett (fat, derogotary) or übergewichtig (overweight).


6

Let me offer the following popular children's rhyme as one more example to show that it is not a "serious" expression of greeting : (in a sing-song voice) Hallihallo Wer sitzt am Klo Der Krampus und der Nikolo (it's about two figures of children's folklore sitting on the toilet)


8

In addition to infinitezero's accurate answer, let me add some practical experiences of this expression, which should also be an answer to joki3's comment above. A few years ago, my German teacher came to my place of work, where we had 1 hour of German instruction in a classroom setting. She would invariably enter the room with a "Halli Hallo", ...


23

Halli Hallo is a joyful informal expression to greet someone. The Halli does not have any special meaning. I think it's very rarely used, especially among adults. Children might use it more often. If you use it with your (German) friends, you will likely get a laugh as a response, because it sounds funny and foreigners are not really expected to know this ...


1

Da drüben ist ein Restaurant. Nur mal so. This would be my choice as a native speaker. It's appropriate for informal situations among not too old people, which I think is the intention of the question. Other options mentioned above could be too formal/long/unwieldy. But this is also personal taste. Depends on how explicit or implicit you want to be with your ...


1

Funny enough, there is a German idiom which fits in many situations quite nicely and means, taken literally, almost the opposite: Ich will ja nichts sagen, aber ... That phrase is a little cocky, but so is the English one ("just saying" with a little shrug can be pretty disrespectful). Both can be used in situations where somebody misses something ...


2

I don't think it is the German phrase you are looking for, but "There's never only one cockroach" works.


21

Das ist wahrscheinlich nur die Spitze des Eisbergs: The visible part indicates the presence of a larger, not yet discovered part.


0

I could only think of a few additions to Ralf Joerres' very comprehensive answer: mir langt's, colloquial, southern German alternative for mir reicht's: "I've had enough of this". Also, es langt jetzt, "enough is enough". ich hab die Schnauze voll, vulgar, literally, "my snout is full": "I'm fed up with this" ich kann ...


8

One could say Manchmal zieht ein Programmierfehler einen (ganzen) Rattenschwanz an weiteren Problemen nach sich. Rattenschwanz meaning generally a series of negative consequences resulting from a problem. But that does not exactly reflect your idea. A further quite usual and more or less unidomatic way to say what tofro means is Wo ein Fehler ist, da ...


28

Try ein Fehler kommt selten allein (Note the saying is actually with "Unglück", which could be used as well if you don't mind a more unspecific translation)


5

Some ideas: Ich krieg' zu viel! is a a humerous exclamation of despair: Jetzt funktioniert der Drucker schon wieder nicht, ich krieg hier noch mal zuviel! etwas wird mir zu viel can refer to anything that exceeds the speaker's tolerance threshold (there is too much noise, there are too many telephone calls in too short time, too many tasks to fulfil for my ...


10

"full of mistakes" can be translated as "voller Fehler" or "voll von Fehlern" or "voll mit Fehlern". If you want a single word you could use fehlerstrotzend in an attributive context, e.g. "ein fehlerstrotzender Text". I, personally, would not use it not in a predicative way like "Der Text ist ...


1

It's hard to tell which meaning of "stub" was meant when someone decided to use it for a minimal article, but my best guess it's taken from programming (especially top-down) where stub is a non-functioning function/subroutine/class that consists of a declaration with no actual code. Basically, in order to write the upper level code before taking ...


2

I don't know what other people call it, but I refer to stubs that contain a skeleton structure and predefined text blocks (Textbausteine) as Textgerüst or simply Gerüst.


1

Rudiment or rudimentär seem fitting, this is used in software development in a comparable sense: "Feature xy wurde bisher nur rudimentär umgesetzt, eine bessere Implementation folgt in Version z." Maybe Bruchstück or bruchstückhaft, which is often used for something incomplete, although in a literal sense, "Bruchstück" suggests a part of ...


6

Rumpfartikel oder Artikelrumpf would be usable here. Composites with "Rumpf-" are being used as "minimum" in places in German (like "Rumpfmannschaft", for example. "Stummel" or "Kontrollabschnitt" wouldn't fit at all,unfortunately. "Platzhalter" would be another possibility.


1

Ich hoffe diese Nachricht erreicht dich bei bester Gesundheit would be the German equivalent. It is not very common though. https://books.google.de/books?id=Bb5uAgAAQBAJ&lpg=PT53&ots=jXCgJpears&dq=ich%20hoffe%20diese%20nachricht%20erreicht%20dich%20bei%20bester%20gesundheit&hl=de&pg=PT53#v=onepage&q=ich%20hoffe%20diese%20nachricht%...


3

I think, that the only use in a German letter (business or personal) would be to write "ich hoffe, es geht Ihnen gut", but you would only write this after you haven´t corresponded for a long time. If you just had a conversation a week ago, it would be strange to write that. I just received it in a business mail from a person I have seen 2 days ago, ...


3

Das ist definitiv Konventionssache, weil wir im Deutschen dort keine Nuancen anbringen, also musst du selbst eine Konvention festlegen. Ich persönlich nehme Hexenmeister oder seltener Hexer für Warlock (Wobei man hier auch aufpassen muss, je nach Fantasy setting gibt es beispielsweise bei witcher und witch also Hexer und Hexe Unterschiede. In DnD sind Hexen ...


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