Hot answers tagged

26

Ein Übergrößengeschäft ist ein Laden, der sich auf Kleidung oder Schuhe in Übergrößen spezialisiert hat.


26

Gauss’s signature on Wikipedia does not use an ß ligature because it is written in roman script, and an ß ligature in roman script did not yet exist at the time. Historically, German ß originated in blackletter type (or handwriting based thereupon like kurrent) as a ligature of long ſ and ʒ, the blackletter form of z. This ligature only existed in ...


25

Short answer: Take a look at MySQL and different character-collations. Choose one and follow its rules. Or as @RHa and @cbeleites suggest find a library that provides locale-dependent sorting. Long answer: There are 3 different solutions for your problem (actually there are 4, but believe me, you don't want to realize the 4th ;) ) Rewrite every Umlaut to ...


22

To attack the premise of the question: What are the arguments for substituting ß with sz? A lot of things happened to German spelling (and pronunciaton) since the appearance of the letter eszett. In particular, what once made sz the preferred choice of letters to represent what we now write as ß¹ is long gone. So, while the eszett bears the letters s and z ...


19

First, of all, it looks as if Google digitalised the long s (ſ) as s most of the time. Then, one has to consider the following four variants of s-spelling. I distinguish between the case where a long s (ſ) is used (mostly blackletter fonts) and where it is not (mostly antiqua fonts): Heyse’s rules – ſs (ss) after short vowels: dass, müsst, ließ (antiqua); ...


18

No, personal names are always spelled as they are officially registered on birth. They do not fall under the changes of rules of New German Orthography.(1) If an ß is not available (on your keyboard), you can use ss instead.(Regel 160)


17

Just checked my collection of Duden: 1880 – Not in the book (Faksimile 1990) 1924 – Miß (Misses, pl) 1947 – Miß (Misses, pl) (Leipzig) 1991 – Miß (in engl. spelling Miss) 2006 – Miss For good measure two Knaur: 1932 – Miß 1965 – Miss So Miß was the correct spelling until the reform(s) in 1996/2004/2006 and there was a time when the English spelling was ...


16

Historically, the "ß" originated from a ligature between two originally separate letters. There are two important ligatures to mention: One is the ligature between a "long s" and a lowercase "z". The "long s" was a letter that isn't used anymore. It looked a bit like a lowercase "f". This part of the origin ...


14

Officially, there is no such thing. Yes, some typographers have designed a ß to better go along with other capital letters, but it's still a (very) far cry from universal adoption. Since there are no words starting with ß you'd only need it for all caps. Just use SS for now, is my advice, if you must.


14

Natürlich nicht. Im Deutschen nutzen wir keine griechischen Buchstaben, so ähnlich sie irgendwelchen anderen lateinischen Buchstaben aussehen mögen. Das Eszett entstand als Ligatur von ſ und s, und hat mit dem Beta nun mal gar nichts zu tun. Meiner Meinung nach störst du dich daran zurecht. Sollte ß mal nicht verfügbar sein, soll ss benutzt werden - so ist ...


13

Miß (sic) seems to have been an accepted spelling back in the 1960’s. Take this article from the Zeit, e.g.: Denn auf der glatten Stirn dieser Jung-Parlamentarierin namens Dr. Ursula Krips ziehen steile Unmutsfalten auf, wenn sie daran erinnert wird, daß eilfertige Reporter ihr den Titel „Miß Bundestag“ verpaßt haben: „Politik ist doch kein Schaugeschäft! ...


13

No, they cannot be used interchangeably nowadays. However, spelling used to be less strict, so in older documents you may find several spellings for the same person. Consequently, surnames today often exist in several spellings. There are people called Schulz and people called Schultz. There is Meier and Maier. There is Voss and Voß.


12

Official rules As of 29.06.2017, the official spelling rules allow to use the capital eszett (ẞ) and SS when capitalising ß; they do not allow using a lowercase ß (§ 25 E3): Bei Schreibung mit Großbuchstaben schreibt man SS. Daneben ist auch die Verwendung des Großbuchstabens ẞ möglich. Beispiel: Straße – STRASSE – STRAẞE Frequency of usage From my ...


12

Oh Mann, was für ein Freitag! Da kommt man motiviert in die Firma, um der Arbeitswoche die letzten paar Stunden abzuringen, und dann gibt’s nur Probleme. Seit ein paar Tagen ist in der Produktion eine Maschine defekt. Bei der heutigen Lieferung des Ersatzteils stellt sich heraus, dass etwas mit der Bestellung schiefgegangen ist. Im Paket befand sich eine ...


12

I am not aware of any such list, but I don't think it would be very long. Here are the few words that I can contribute: Busse (plural to Bus) vs. Buße (penitence; in Switzerland also a fine, but spelled Busse there) ein Muss (a "must") vs. ein Muß Mus (mush, this was a mistake by me, but i keep it as an example for an ambiguity between ss and s) Rußen (...


11

Wenn ein s im Auslaut stimmlos gesprochen wird, liegt dies an der Auslautverhärtung des Deutschen, die auch dazu führt, dass andere Konsonanten im Auslaut härter ausgesprochen werden – so endet z. B. die Aussprache von Wald genauso wie die von Halt. Wenn nun Begungsformen oder andere Ableitungen eines Wortes existieren, in denen der entsprechende Konsonant ...


10

Wenn du in Großbuchstaben schreiben musst. Heißt jemand Meißner oder Meissner wenn da MEISSNER steht? Für Namen wurde es auch vor allem eingeführt. Da nach alten Regeln hier immer ein großes SS vorgeschrieben war und man das nicht eindeutig zurück übersetzen konnte.


9

Ein Mikrofilmprinter ist ein Rückvergrößerungsgerät zur Erstellung von Papierkopien aus Mikrofilmen. Analoge Rückvergrößerungsgeräte werden heute nahezu komplett durch Mikrofilmscanner ersetzt. Quelle: http://www.rosenberger-gruppe.de/glossar Bei Google hat es auch viele Bilder dazu. Auf den Treffer esse ich jetzt ein Grießklößchensüppchenschälchen.


8

It was my understanding that 'ß' is a double 's' and can be written with as 'ss', especially for computer applications which don't offer the 'ß' character. Well, no. ß is a ligature (s + z, in case you were wondering) and must be used for certain words (with the exception of Switzerland, who abolished it quite some time ago and simply use ss everywhere ...


8

The premise of the question is skewed. Words containing ss and words containing ß usually have nothing to do with each other etymologically. Similarly to the English homophones knight and night where it would be pointless to ask ‘do the meanings of other words beginning in n change if I add a k?’ The distinction between ß and ss is a phonemic one that stems ...


7

I’ve found some interesting explainations on Wikipedia. Origin of the various substitutes. In the late 18th and early 19th century, when more and more German texts were printed in Roman type, typesetters looked for a Roman counterpart for the blackletter ſz ligature, which did not exist in Roman fonts. Printers experimented with various techniques, ...


7

Der Grund für die Einführung des großen ẞ war eher typographisch als orthographisch: Die bisherige Regelung ließ es zu, um Mißverständnisse zu vermeiden, ein kleines ß inmitten von Großbuchstaben zu verwenden (MAßE statt MASSE). In den meisten Fonts sieht das aber nicht gut aus: Das ß sticht aus verschiedenen Gründen heraus; es ist manchmal höher als die ...


6

As I understand your original question, you are after the regular lower case ß. You can find it on a German keyboard layout: the letter ß is one key to the right of the number zero(0). As others have suggested, the upper case use of ß is normally substituted by SS. I am typing this on a laptop with Windows 8, where I can use a shortcut key to switch ...


6

If you read a capitalized text, you don't expect to substitute letters in your head: you just read the letters. If you see -SS-, you read it in the same way as -ß-: as a voiceless s [s]. If you see -SZ-, you read it as a combination of -s- and -z-: [sts]. So STRASZE wouldn't be read as it should and this confuses. The SS inSTRASSE is read in the same way ...


6

If it's not names you are dealing with, it would be best to ignore all diacritics when sorting (and count ß as ss). The only reason to deviate from this simple system lies in the unfortunate fact that German names show unpredictable variation between ä, ö, ü and ae, oe, ue. This has lead to phone books and library catalogues sorting e.g. Räder as Raeder, ...


5

Unter Windows ohne die Installation von zusätzlicher Software verwendet man die direkten Codes: ä Alt-0228 Ä Alt-0196 ö Alt-0246 Ö Alt-0214 ü Alt-0252 Ü Alt-0220 ß Alt-0223


5

According to Zwiebelfisch, there are four rules: Hinter kurzen Vokalen steht grundsätzlich ss, auch am Wortende: "Das Fass war nass nach der Fahrt im Fluss." Wörter, die auf -nis enden (Hindernis, Erkenntnis) oder auf -ismus (Nationalismus, Liberalismus) werden am Ende selbstverständlich weiterhin nur mit einfachem s geschrieben. Hinter langen ...


5

No. »ss« can not be changed into »ß«. But the other way round is possible. »ss« and »ß« are different. Die Masse means »the mass« (physical property as well as lots of things). But Die Maße means »the measurements« (i.e. lengths) And the two exemplary words are spoken different: A vowel before ss is spoken short, but a vowel before ß is spoken ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible