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Im Raum Norddeutschland / Schleswig-Holstein überall bekannt, auch schon vor 30 Jahren.


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"A HANDBOOK OF GERMANIC ETYMOLOGY" (1) links a bunch of English sources you could find useful for the word "ùt" which is known as origin of "aus" in that century.(2)(3).


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If your premisses is reasonable to assume, then it is also reasonable to assume--perhaps to the extend that the grammar allows it--to find the proposed connection reflected in PIE in a way that does not leave your assumption stand contradicted. *-t is found in various instrumental morphemes [I mean, right?]. So our intuition does not count for much. As the ...


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Short answer: Yes, you are right long answer: English Wiktionary tells you about the German word Bucht: Via German Low German from Middle Low German bucht, from Old Saxon buht, from Proto-Germanic *buhtiz. Cognate with Dutch bocht. German Wiktionary says: von niederdeutsch bucht „Biegung, Krümmung“, „landeinwärts gebogene Strandlinie“, belegt seit ...


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This sounds quite unlikely, because "biegen" is a strong verb, so the past participle ends with -en ("gebogen" in German, "bogen" in Old English). So it would be hard to explain the weak past participle ending -t.


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