New answers tagged

5

In German, the interjection »na« is used to express eagerness (»Na los, komm schon!«), surprise (»Na, so was!«), doubt (»Na, ich weiß nicht.«), denial and indignation (»Na, was erlauben Sie sich!«) and the emotion of the imagination of someones reaction (»Na, da wird sie aber Augen machen!«). Another usage is as preamble of a phrase: hesitating agreement: »...


0

Note that this different order between German and English pertains only to the last two digits: One thousand three hundred and twenty four 1 000 3 00 + 4 20 Ein tausend drei Hundert vier und zwanzig. 1 000 3 00 4 + 20 Roman numeric digits are also not always ordered from largest to smallest: XI = 11 = ...


-1

In the Slavic tradition, the name for Wednesday is commonly derived from the Slavic word for middle. The same also holds true of Hungarian, which, like German itself, also borders on various Slavic countries or territories. Thus, the simplest explanation is Slavic influence. Addressing certain objections raised in the comments: Germany is by far not ...


0

There's a nice German TV episode about that question: https://youtube.com/watch?v=L5YZSZTO2tk


2

http://www.typisch-dresdn.de/10-dresdner-woerter-die-zugezogene-erst-lernen-muessen/ Hier wird das Wort als typisch dresdnerisches Dialektwort ausgewiesen. Ich habe keine Ahnung, ob das stimmt, kann aber als Dresdnerin bestätigen, dass es bei uns in Gebrauch ist.


-1

Back when more relationships were conducted through correspondence on paper, my great-grandmother used this phrase to mean that generally people were nicer in their written letters than they would turn out to be in person.


Top 50 recent answers are included