New answers tagged

3

Your question is about the use of "einen / den Namen tragen". It depends on the context. As a question it is probably outdated and one would use Wie heißt es? Welchen Namen hat es? However, it is still used in a formal context like Die Israelitische Kultusgemeinde Wien hat deshalb bereits im Jahr 2002 gemeinsam mit zahlreichen ...


2

Yes, „den Namen ... tragen“ is still used (not that commonly, however). I suppose one would say „Wie heißt es?“ in the most cases.


2

Yes, it's still used in the context you mentioned.


1

If you want something with more flourish, like in old stories, you can use following: Ich erzähle euch jetzt die Geschichte, wie es dazu kam, dass der Kirchturm drei Uhrwerke bekommen hat. Translation: Ich will now tell you the story how it came to be that the church spire got three clockworks.


6

You can use einmal or mal in the dependent clause to express this: [Kennst du schon] die Geschichte, wie ich mal [von der Polizei verhaftet wurde]? [Sie erzählte] die Geschichte, wie sie einmal [von der Polizei verhaftet wurde]. Alternatively, there's also a colloquial idiom that's more alike to the English way to put it: [Kennst du schon] die Geschichte ...


7

There is an example of this from literature. The novel Sult (Hunger) by the Norwegian Knut Hamsun starts with the sentence: Det var i den Tid, jeg gik omkring og sulted i Kristiania, denne forunderlige By, som ingen forlader, før han har faaet Mærker av den ... which in English translates to: It was in that time when I walked around hungry in Kristiania, ...


14

The most idiomatic way I can think of is Hab' ich dir mal erzählt, wie ich eine Gitarre umsonst bekam? which literally translates to Did I ever tell you, how I got a guitar for free? If you want to include a time period, you can say Hab' ich dir mal von der Zeit erzählt, in der ich als Postbote gearbeitet habe? Or Hab' ich dir mal von meiner Zeit als ...


2

Good question what Goethe means by "an der Nase herumziehen"! I think there are two possible interpretations: It is certainly a synonym for "an der Nase herumführen". In contemporary German this means to intentionally fool (or deceive) somebody else in order to gain an advantage for oneself. I am not convinced that Goethe wanted to ...


0

After all the years of studying he sums up: Da steh' ich nun, ich armer Tor, Und bin so klug als wie zuvor! So he realizes that he doesn't know anything that he could teach someone. And in the next lines: Dass ich nicht mehr mit sauerm Schweiß Zu sagen brauche, was ich nicht weiß; Dass ich erkenne, was die Welt Im Innersten zusammenhält So yes, he is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included