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43 votes
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How do you say “To whom it may concern” in German?

You are right. The correct translation of Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren is (dear) ladies and gentlemen So, »to whom it may concern« seems not to match with »Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren«. ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
41 votes
Accepted

Why the switch from “ihr” to “Sie” in the following speech from Band of Brothers?

This might not be a mistake, but very deliberately done. As comrades of war the general says du and ihr to his fellows. But at the very end of his speech, he wants to make clear that this is over and ...
Beta's user avatar
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31 votes
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Why do Netflix German subtitles always make use of formal pronouns?

The answer is probably that the choice between du and Sie in productions translated from English is not always necessarily natural. Primarily, this is due to the fact that English does not make the ...
O. R. Mapper's user avatar
  • 8,777
28 votes

What is the best way to say “gentle reminder” in German?

You can use "Freundliche Erinnerung". Anonther possibility often used is "Höfliche Erinnerung" (polite reminder). And I would suggest to use the verb: "Wir möchten Sie höflich erinnern,...".
IQV's user avatar
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25 votes

Is ‘hallöchen’ appropriate between a professor and a student?

Generally speaking - no. I would only use this greeting in very informal situations, and the minimum requirement would be that I say "Du" to the other person. Nowadays, what is considered acceptable ...
Gerhard's user avatar
  • 2,444
19 votes

Should I use the "Sie" form or the "du" form for a thank you note to a customer?

The usual way of talking to people you don't personally know in any kind of business relationship would be "Sie". Even on eBay, eBay classifieds, other Craiglist-like marketplaces, or on ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.3k
19 votes

is German becoming more informal?

It is not a southern-German thing. Based on personal experience, I can safely say that German has become more informal in the last 20 years. Using Du has become more common, in a way that it feels ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
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18 votes
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Ist es schlechter Stil einen Satz mit "deshalb" zu beginnen?

Die Zeit hat vor einigen Jahren mal eine Reihe "Deutsch-Stilkunde" veröffentlicht. Lektion 11 war "Satzanfang". Dort wird der Einstieg mit "Deshalb" (eine Inversion) als "einfache und meist ...
Tobi's user avatar
  • 1,450
17 votes

How do you say “To whom it may concern” in German?

Short answer: There is no direct equivalent for To whom it may concern in the German speaking part of the world. Of course there are other things to write on top of documents, but it depends on the ...
15 votes

How do you say “To whom it may concern” in German?

You're saying that you're sceptical because it's plural and you're addressing a single person. However, I think that's the actual misunderstanding, because in German formal writing there are basically ...
amadeusamadeus's user avatar
12 votes

Should I use the "Sie" form or the "du" form for a thank you note to a customer?

Adding to HalvarF's fine answer: It might be worth to consider which of the options creates the least negative effect: addressing customers that are fine with "Du" as "Sie" will ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 338
11 votes

What is the best way to say “gentle reminder” in German?

In the context of a business relation with a customer you'd usually ask if they require additional information before they can reply. That way you don't pressure them, but really remind them gently, ...
simbabque's user avatar
  • 510
10 votes

„Danke für Ihre Bemühungen/Mühe“ in Brief oder E-Mail

Ich persönlich finde es sehr schwer hier pauschalisierend einen Rat zu geben, das hängt immer vom Kontext ab. Bedankung ist immer gut; "Mühe" bevorzugt, "Bemühungen" haben immer etwas gezwungenes, ...
Thomas's user avatar
  • 2,961
10 votes

The correct ways to use Sie in nominative?

The "Sie" with a capital "s" is used to formally address someone directly. That means that it has the same function as the informal "du". However, grammaticaly "Sie" is used differently than the "du",...
Matt S's user avatar
  • 442
10 votes

How to say: 'to you, too' or 'you as well'

I usually respond to: "Schönes Wochenende!" with "Gleichfalls!" or "Ihnen/Dir auch!" or, less formal: "Auch so!" Of course, to be polite, you could start the response with a "Danke!".
Rudy Velthuis's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Hast du eine App, die Google Maps heißt oder die heißt Google Maps?

In your variation, only the first is correct, interpretable and likely to be heard that way, no matter how formal or informal the situation. Moving the finite verb to the end of a subordinate clause ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
9 votes
Accepted

Formal greeting without specific recipient

The best choice is Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, Nothing can go wrong if you use this standard salutation. This is not necessary: Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren der Firma Müller & Mayer, ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
9 votes

Why do Netflix German subtitles always make use of formal pronouns?

Your assumption that it is not a slip-up because it is Netflix may be wrong. If it was too expensive to put effort in proper dubs or subtitle, or if it does not pay off otherwise they simply will not ...
Takkat's user avatar
  • 70.5k
8 votes

Why do Netflix German subtitles always make use of formal pronouns?

In the German dubbed version Sherlock and John also use Sie when talking to each other. One reason might be, that they still have a somehow professional relationship which maybe should be enforced by ...
tallistroan's user avatar
  • 1,094
8 votes

Should I use the "Sie" form or the "du" form for a thank you note to a customer?

This entirely depends on your target group. About 20 years ago, there would have been probably no discussion about this, and "Sie" would have been the way to go. However, nowadays it's way ...
infinitezero's user avatar
  • 18.4k
8 votes
Accepted

is German becoming more informal?

I fully agree with the very good answer by @JonathanHerrera, but I think a few more examples of situations, where Duzen has become the norm, may be helpful. If you want to have even more details, ...
Sebastian Riese's user avatar
7 votes

Usage of the ur- prefix

The answer See https://www.dwds.de/wb/ur- which is very helpful, especially when you have a look on the etymology. You are right in stating that ur- is used to refer to the origin of something far ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
  • 16.9k
7 votes
Accepted

How should I translate archaic English verb conjugations such as "thou art" into German?

There is no direct analogy of the English phenomenon in German. If you just look for old-fashioned manners of addressing someone, using the second person plural pronoun Ihr for a respectful way of ...
6 votes
Accepted

Kurze Glückwunschformeln zum Neujahr

Es gibt hier zwei Möglichkeiten: Du schreibst Glückwünsche zum Jahresende und möchtest deinem Gegenüber im Voraus ein gutes Neues wünschen; Du nimmst nach den Feiertagen wieder Kontakt auf und ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
6 votes

The correct ways to use Sie in nominative?

du, sie German is a T-V-language, this means, for 2nd person ("you" in English) there are two different forms. One form is used when talking to children, family members and good friends, the other ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Using "bzw." abbreviated in a formal text

I don't see any reason why you shouldn't use "bzw.". It's a very common abbreviation, after all. But you can use even less known abbreviations or abbreviation specific to the text at hand (e.g. ...
Em1's user avatar
  • 38.6k
5 votes

What is the best way to say “gentle reminder” in German?

As @simbabque already gave you an example, I'll try to give you another choice for such an answer: Anrede [e.g. Hallo Herr/Frau XYZ.. or Sehr geehrter Herr XYZ/Sehr geehrte Frau XYZ..], ich möchte ...
pallox's user avatar
  • 149
5 votes

How do you say “To whom it may concern” in German?

From above: There is no direct equivalent for To Whom It May Concern: in the German speaking part of the world. It would appear, at least according to a cursory search, that the English speaking ...
Martin Ba's user avatar
  • 455
5 votes
Accepted

Formal / Informal "you" when referring to God

In the first part you seem to mistake who talks to whom in Samuel 2 24:14. This is a conversation between two humans (David and Gad. It is not a typo. Gad is a son of Jacob). Of course they refer to ...
planetmaker's user avatar
  • 10.7k

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