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21

der Strandkorb The literal translation is beach basket — which should be pretty obvious if you look at it, and where it is usually found. They are extremely common on beaches on the North Sea in Germany, where weather and wind are usually even worse than on northern French beaches.


15

In German that is a Strandkorb. A two-part hooded chair, traditionally made of wicker, that provides shelter from wind and sand and is a common beach accessoire on both the German North Sea and Baltic Sea beaches. Typically they are available for rent there, as they are too unwieldy to lug around.


13

I think you mean jemandem in nichts nachstehen which is used to express equality, both positively and ironically.


11

Er aber fuhr mich an, auch er und alle dächten an uns. I think, the confusion lies in the meaning of fuhr jemand an. This is the preterite tense of jemand anfahren (see meaning [6]), which translates to snapping or snarling at somebody. The verb form that you erroneously thought of is jemand anführen (see meanings [1] and [4]), which translates to leading ...


10

I would propose the word "unbedeutend", either to replace klein or adding it. Also I would add "wie ich"(like myself) after Mensch (if you're reffering to yourself): Was könnte ein kleiner, unbedeutender Mensch wie ich je gegen [...] Was könnte ein unbedeutender Mensch wie ich je gegen[...]


9

A word like that would be called a "Scheingallizismus". "Gallizismen" are loan words from French, like for example "Anglizismen" are loan words from English. Words that seem to originate from the respective language but actually don't (anymore) are called "Schein-" (roughly meaning "pseudo"), in our case "Scheinanglizismus" or "Scheingallizismus". An often ...


9

To express this kind of exaggeration the Germans use Aber sich jetzt auch noch die Handlinien umoperieren zu lassen ... or Aber sich deswegen gleich die Handlinien umoperieren zu lassen ... The first one is a little rougher and therefore more popular with malicious tongues (bei Lästerern beliebter).


8

A very literal translation would be: Es ist nicht jedem gegeben... But that’s typically used for personal traits and talents or rather, lack thereof. It’s also a touch stilted and old-fashioned. In your example, the simpler Nicht jeder kann... is probably the better choice, being more colloquial and idiomatic. Your translations would also work ...


8

In the exact same situations the French would have used "Enchanté", in German you would (have) used Sehr erfreut (without anything added). This is a near-literal translation (with French level of enthusiasm translated to German reserve, though...) that used to be the classic greeting, if you would have, for example, been introduced to a female host. This ...


8

No. Much more "strongly influenced" than other German dialects it is not. Slightly more it is. All German dialects and standard German are heavily influenced by French. The amount of distinctly really French origin words and expressions specifically and uniquely Berlinerisch seems rather small. French speaking aristocracy of old, some immigrants ...


8

The term "à la carte" is used in German as well with the same meaning. I think it should be written as in french, but you might also find it without the accent. (Because entering accented characters on a German keyboard requires typing the accent and the letter seperately. Or people might not know how to enter accented characters. Or many people ...


7

I think a heated argument would be best translated by eine hitzige Diskussion haben That would usually mean two or more people strongly disagree in certain points, and both/all are defending their opinions with vigor. They will most likely being involved emotionally. Your other example with Als ich es ihr sagte, gab es ein gewaltiges Donnerwetter, ...


7

Angenehm! Angenehm, <your own last name>. is an old-fashioned way to greet someone who had just been introduced to you. Still appropriate for formal occasions. If you happen to know the person, you are expected to be more chatty.


6

In German there are two different meanings for "prescription" depending on what a medical doctor prescribed: Das (ärztliche) Rezept Whenever a doctor prescribes a medication we call this "Rezept". It includes both, ready made pharmaceuticals or a recipy for an individual drug preparation. This prescription then is usually given to a pharmacist using the ...


6

Here is this sentence with some stylistic improvements (more idiomatic German; register of speech: casual but not sloppy oral communicaiton): Ich habe zwar nicht viel Ahnung von Astronomie, aber: Was könnte die Menschheit je gegen so ein riesiges Objekt ausrichten, wenn es direkt auf die Erde zuraste? This does perhaps not answer your question for ...


5

The idiom for your second example (mostly used in written language): Ehe man sichs versieht, ist es schon Wochenende. The meaning is »faster as expected« and would (with the meaning »instantly«) also be suitable for your first example. Ehe man sichs versah, fiel er wie ein Stein ins Bett.


5

No. It's the same as in French. Im Kopf haben has no particular connotation. Ich habe immer noch den Geruch der See im Kopf. It's the memory of the scent in my head. Du, Stefan hat echt nur noch Nina im Kopf. Stefan is doted upon Nina. Sie hat immer so schräge Ideen im Kopf. Schräge Ideen aren't bad but just odd. What's important is the ...


5

The possibly most prominent pseudo-French word in German is Friseur (hairdresser, the actual French word being coiffeur). However, according to the German Wikipedia Friseur the word did exist in French, but was never very popular and is nowadays extinct.


5

Let's start with Wikipedia Some other hits in the internet: https://www.problem-hilfe.de/franzoesisch/h.php/Faux_Amis/nicht_existent.html http://www.castel-franc.com/blog/faux-amis-falsche-freunde


5

Interesting, I immediately thought I knew that sentence from somewhere. But it took me a while to remember it. Are you trying to translate Günther Anders, "Die molussische Katakombe"? Wow, that's a tough job! The book, although it was published in 1992, was written in 1930. The language is therefore somewhat antiquated and would probably not be used like ...


4

The typical phrase to emphasize on extremes is: Ich habe ja schon mal eine Stunde auf den Zug gewartet, aber dass der sich so verspätet … If the subject in main and dependent clause is identical, you can use an infinitive clause instead of the object clause: Sie war ja schon immer 'ne Esospinnerin, aber dass sie sich die Handlinien chirurgisch ändern ...


4

Another possibility would be to switch to a metaphor as Was könnte ich als Erdenwurm gegen so ein riesiges Objekt ausrichten... Here Wurm is representative for a small and weak animal.


4

Your are on the right track. In the example phrase, unerreichbar is an adverb, which can be translated to English as unreachably (notice the adverb ending -ly). It specifies the adjective entfernt, which can be translated to English as far or distanced. Put together, this becomes: nicht mehr als zehn Fuß über uns, aber unerreichbar entfernt durch eine ...


4

I second Bodo's answer concerning the fact that "à la carte" is used and should/mostly will be written with an accent. Note, however, that, at least in Germany, the definition is even a bit "wider": "À la carte" does mean in a general sense that you order the pre-defined dishes from the menu (the list of offered dishes). The ...


3

Hier are a number of popular expressions: Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß der Teufel wie viele Kontrollen durch. Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß Gott wie viele Kontrollen durch. Am Flughafen musst du dann durch wer weiß wie viele Kontrollen durch. [This tends to be related to the future, not to past experience] Am Flughafen musstet wir durch weiß ...


3

The sentence En arrivant à l'aéroport, on est passés par je ne sais combien de contrôles de sécurité tous plus rigoureux les uns que les autres. can be translated almost literally. The following sentence sounds totally natural: Bei der Ankunft am Flughafen mussten wir durch - ich weiß nicht wie viele - Sicherheitskontrollen, eine strenger als die andere. ...


3

Probably the best word in such a list has be Politesse meaning: kommunale Angestellte, die die Einhaltung der Parkvorschriften überwacht Describing a female traffic warden. But looking into etymology we get only the French: Etymologie Politesse1 f. ‘Höflichkeit, Galanterie’, Übernahme (17. Jh.) von gleichbed. frz. politesse, zu frz. poli Adj. ‘...


3

Probably "Prussia" is used here in the sense of "the lands ruled by the Hohenzollern dynasty", not as "the Baltic coast between the Weichsel and Memel rivers". The explanation that I have heard a lot is that Berlin had a lot of Huguenot immigrants in the late 17th and early 18th century and that this is where words like plärren (...


2

Weitere Formen, wie man heutzutage das sagen kann, was die Altvorderen mit "Angenehm!" und "Sehr erfreut!" (siehe andere Antworten hier) ausdrückten, wären: Schön, dass Sie gekommen sind! Schön, dass Sie da sind! Freut mich! Schön, Sie zu sehen! Schön, Sie kennenzulernen! Naaaa? Es kommt natürlich auf das Szenario an. Kommt ...


2

Pollitzer's answer is suitable In formal speech and written language. In colloquial speech I'd rather use die hat's gerade nötig (was zu sagen) [don't know what she is talking about] NB: Beware - shifting the phonetic stress to 'nötig' changes the meaning completely, into a rude comment ( 'she is needy right now' ).


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