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4

The asterisk, colon and underscore forms of gendering (Zuhörer*innen, Zuhörer:innen, Zuhörer_innen) have become popular in academia and in left-leaning social/political environments in the last 2-3 years. They're also used, albeit a bit less commonly, in public broadcasting ("öffentlich-rechtlicher Rundfunk") and public service and governmental ...


3

To fulfil what that useless genderism triggers, the logical answer is you have to add a third component to your greeting to adapt it to the "modern" development: Sehr geehrte Damen, Herren und Diverse This will accept Diverse as fully equal to Damen and Herren. Though you will get the problem of who is first in the order and could complain to be ...


4

In addition to what was already said: Alternatively, depending on the occasion, you could avoid to address the crowd directly at all. In many circumstances, something like this will work just as well: Einen guten Abend wünsche ich Ihnen allen. Ich freue mich, dass Sie sich die Zeit genommen haben. ... Ich möchte heute über ... sprechen ... No one will ...


0

The formulation "Dear Sir or Madam!" is sufficient when addressing people of both male and female gender. When more than two genders are to be addressed, there are various formulation options. There are gender-neutral ways of writing that include all people. The gender asterisk or gender gab can be used or the specific target group can be addressed....


1

We had a similiar question about email headings. In a in person meeting, you could use phrases like Liebe(s)/Sehr geehrte(s)... ...Teilnehmende ...Publikum


6

My sister is a nurse. She got her diploma in the middle of the 1980ies (somewhen between 1983 and 1985), and I always found it odd that she is the Schwester for only me, but Krankenschwester for everybody, and I always found it odd, that her male colleagues are not called Krankenbruder. The official term for her profession is »Diplompfleger« or »...


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