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55

You are falling into the trap laid out carefully by German Gender Mainstreaming throughout the years. No, in German a noun does not have a gender. It has a genus. This genus is a purely grammatical property defined by tradition. By default, it has nothing to do with biological sex or sociological gender. The word der Student is a masculine noun describing ...


31

When I started to learn English, my teacher told me If you are not going to make at least a hundred mistakes every day, you are not going to improve. I believe this is true for learning any language. While in my professional career I came across a lot of German learners, all of them had at least some trouble finding the right gender - I was still ...


31

In German language, the word "das" is not only an article. It has a second meaning: It can also have the meanings of the English words "this" or "that". If the word "das" means "this", there are no different words for male, female and neuter but there is only one word: "das". In your sentence, the word "das" is not used as article but it means "this". By ...


25

The singular form is das Bächlein and, as you correctly state, this is a neuter diminutive that ends in -lein; die Bächlein is the plural form. For completeness, here is the declension table for the noun Bächlein: Singular: Plural: Nom.: das Bächlein die Bächlein Gen.: des Bächleins der Bächlein Dat.: dem Bächlein den Bächlein ...


24

Die Bowle (punch) The name stems from the english "bowl" referring the vessel it is served in. Bowle is usually cold, for hot varieties we use the term der Punsch (which is punch) One exception, though: "Feuerzangenbowle" is hot, so technically not a "Bowle". A special Bowle is die Kalte Ente ("cold duck"), basically a mix of white wine and champagne with ...


23

According to a footnote in this study (Warning: PDF file): The distribution of the three genders in German is as follows. There are 4164 monomorphemic nouns listed in the CELEX database (Baayen, Piepenbrock, & Gulikers, 1995). Fifty-one of these have multiple genders (e.g., der See [the lake]vs. die See [the sea]). Of the remaining 4113 ...


23

There is no fixed "rule" to define the gender of a loanword in German. This means that we have to look them up in a dictionary when in doubt. Still, some principles hold true for many loanwords that have been nicely summarized with some examples in the essay on the "Gender of foreign nouns" from canoo.net: The "origin principle": Foreign nouns have ...


23

German inherited its three-gender system from Proto-Indoeuropean, but the reason that language had it is lost in the mists of time. Some languages kept this. Others reduced to two genders (e.g. French before the Normans invaded Britain in 1066). English still had three genders up to that point. Once the two languages started to merge they gave up the ...


22

Zum Genus von „Butter“ gibt es eine Karte im Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache:


21

In German every cheese name is masculine: "der Parmesan", "der Mozzarella", "der Ricotta", "der Gouda", "der Camembert", and so on.


20

It's "die Nacht" in the standard nominative case, but Rammstein's line is using it in the dative case, which is "der" for feminine nouns. Remember that there are 4 cases for nouns, and that the article and adjective declinations change depending on what case you are using. See here for all the different cases for Nacht.


19

As a long-time active learner of German language I can tell you that all these rules about how the gender of a certain word can be inferred using its ending or its category: they can help you to come up with a good guess if you don't have a dictionary at hand, but they won't help you much during a conversation or while writing an email. At least I couldn't ...


19

I'm sure this is a misunderstanding. Two points: The "-e"-ending appears to be a relict from times when German still formed the Dative with a suffix. It's retained in phrases like "im Jahre xxxx", in quotations like "dem Manne kann geholfen werden". Perfectly correct, if not extremely common. Secondly: Where does it say feminine on the LEO page? Edit: ...


19

If you know the name, use the name. That’s the easy part. You can often still get away with ‘generisches Maskulinum’, i.e. Studenten, but in a university setting, i.e. where you’d actually use Student and Studentin to refer to students (instead of Schüler and Schülerin ‘pupil’ in a school or most other courses), it’s becoming rather common to use ...


18

First of all, there is no clear scheme after which the genders of loanwords are determined (see also this question). Even with words that are in the process of being loaned right now, native speakers find it hard to agree on the gender (e.g., I have seen any gender for Blog) and even if they do, it’s hard to pinpoint the reason. But let’s have a look at ...


18

As is true with all languages all through time, linguistic features are not extant in order to 'serve a purpose', but rather often as remnants of things that once served purposes, then became obsolete. One good point to direct you in further research of the history of language development: https://linguistlist.org/issues/5/5-525.html And one good read on a ...


18

Oh boy, you just opened the box of Pandora as this is part of an ongoing discussion in Germany. I'll give an answer without politics first but I feel that this answer also needs to take a look at the political side because some people might feel offended which may cause problems at a workplace for you. w/o politics Generally speaking, German has the ...


18

Ganz allgemein gesprochen ist in diesem Kontext, also wenn es um Prädikative geht, Movierung nicht nötig. Viele Sprecher nehmen keinen Anstoß an Sätzen wie den folgenden, wo das Geschlecht (Sexus) durch das Subjekt gekennzeichnet wird. Sie ist Professor/Informatiker/Nazi/… Belege: Denn sie war Nazi, geboren in der elitären Naziszene in Bayern. (FAZ) ...


17

Der folgende Satz wird von Sprechern unterschiedlich bewertet (Stichwort: generisches Maskulinum). Als beleidigend kann er aber meines Erachtens nicht aufgefaßt werden.* (an eine weibliche Person gerichtet) Du bist ein anderer Lehrer. Um ihn dennoch zu vermeiden, schlage ich vor: Du bist eine andere Lehrkraft. Hier steht eine Femininum sowohl für ...


17

Very often you have a vague idea of what you want to say, and with this idea often comes some words that have similar meanings, but still are not exactly what you want to say. So you often use their genders to find an article. And when it's wrong, you just correct it when you've found the right word. Hast du meinen Schlüsselbund gesehen? Ja, der liegt ...


16

Die Butter Hier handelt es sich um ein Lehnwort aus dem griechischen βούτυρον oder dem lateinischen butyrum. Vielleicht war daher das Geschlecht des Wortes nie ganz klar. Siehe dazu auch folgende Fragen hier: Do Latin loanwords conserve their gender? For new words which are often nouns who sets the gender? In unterschiedlichen Regionen Deutschlands wurde ...


16

Die falsche Verwendung von Kommentar mit das statt der in Texten deutschsprachiger Internetseiten ist auch der Redaktion des Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache aufgefallen. Ein regionales Muster dieser Verwendung konnte jedoch nicht festgestellt werden.


16

In cases where the article is nominative and just there to define the gender of the noun: Yes, there would be very small effects to the language. But as stated in the comments: Some times the article is the only thing that can be used to identify the case, then sentences may be completely missunderstood. e.g. in German both sentences (though a little ...


16

Your question is smart and beautiful. Thank you for raising this issue here. As a non-native speaker, I guess I have your answer. In German, there are two kinds of adjectives formed with the suffix -er and are undeclinable: Adjectives formed from the names of cities and towns (like your example): Die Weimarer Republik. Das Berliner Stadtschloss. ...


16

Auf die Frage Ist das deine Jacke? ist die im Deutschen übliche Antwortformulierung: Nein, das ist nicht meine Jacke. Wenn du "Sie ist nicht meine Jacke" sagst, erkennt jeder, dass du Deutsch erst lernst und die üblichen Ausdrucksformen noch nicht sicher beherrschst. Diese Ausdrucksform mit "das" gilt sogar, wenn es um Menschen geht: Ist das ...


15

In der Tat variiert das Genus der Wörter mit dem Stamm „-mut“ stark. Zwar überwiegt das Maskulinum, aber es gibt durchaus auch nicht wenige Feminina, und sogar ein Wort, bei dem beide Genera vorkommen: Maskulin: Bekennermut, Edelmut, Frevelmut, Heldenmut, Hochmut, Kampfesmut, Kleinmut, Lebensmut, Löwenmut, Mannesmut, Missmut, Opfermut, Unmut, Wagemut, ...


15

Is the gender important for your statement? In this case: probably no. So use the "neutral" form which is almost always the male form. If you want to express that you are going to that type of person (or shop...) who will finally fix that rotten tooth / cut your hair / bake & sell bread... you go "zum Zahnarzt" / "zum Friseur" / "zum Bäcker"... ...


15

The word Mitternacht is some centuries younger than Mittwoch and Mittag. Mitternacht derives from 14th century phrases such as vor mitter nahte (‘before middle night’), where mitter is an adjective in dative singular. By reanalysis, the new noun mitternaht developed. (See Pfeifer’s Etymologisches Wörterbuch, via DWDS.)


14

Your confusion is effected through the plural form: der Sinn, die Sinne. In diesem Sinne is only one Sinn, not many Sinne. The dative of der Sinn is built up with dem and not der as in feminine nouns. So it is correct to say In diesem Sinne. (Regarding the -e take notice of Mac's answer)


14

Das Substantiv Ruderer ist eine männliche Personenbezeichnung, die aus dem Verbstamm ruder (vom Verb rudern) und der Endung -er gebildet wird. Weibliche Bezeichnungen werden mit dem Suffix -in zur männlichen Form gebildet. Da das Doppel-er in der Mitte eines Wortes jedoch schwer auszusprechen ist, wird es zu einem er zusammengefasst. Das ist im Deutschen ...


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