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7

Indo-European *t normally becomes *Þ in proto-Germanic and then /d/ in High German. You have cited some examples for this. But thousand/tausend is an exception. In Old High German we have both the expected dūsunt and the unexpected tūsent. This variation is an example of “Notker’s Anlautgesetz”, which (simply put) stipulates that initial voiced stops b, d, g ...


1

English thousand and German tausend are really cognates: Modern German: tausend pronunciation: [ˈtaʊ̯zn̩t], [ˈtaʊ̯zɛnt] Modern Englisch: thousand [ˈθaʊzn̩t], [ˈθaʊzənd] Middle High German: tusend [ˈtuːzɛnt] Old High German: thusend [ˈtʰuːzɛnt] (note, that [tʰ] is not [θ]) but also dusund [ˈduːsʊnt], [ˈduːzʊnt] Old English: þusend (probably [ˈθuːzɛnt]) But ...


0

There is the book 501 German Verbs by Henry Strutz. This will do the job for you.


2

Das deutsche Wiktionary hat eine Liste von Verb-Listen: Wiktionary:Verzeichnis:Deutsch/Verben Diese Liste enthält 11 Einträge, die jeweils Links zu Listen von Verben sind. Diese 11 Listen wiederum enthalten einzelne Verben, beispielsweise enthält die Liste der regelmäßigen Verben ca. 3000 Verben. Jedes einzelne Verb steht als Link in der Liste. Klickt man ...


4

The literal meaning of "übersichtlich" is something like "it is very feasible to look at everything of it at once". This can be because it is very well layed out, but this can also be because there is very little of it. The connotation of the word is usually positive; but it can be (as in this quote) used as a euphemism. Translating it ...


3

The scene is in a Nouvelle Cuisine restaurant, and the guests get served tiny portions. How does a gentleman diplomatically say that portions are tiny without saying that portions are tiny? Loriot's character, after short hesitation, comes up with "übersichtlich", which normally means that something is well-ordered and thus easy to grasp. This is ...


5

Edit: I think the question is best answered by the semi-official English translation, offered by the Bundesministerium der Justiz (German Federal Ministry of Justice): Section 123 Trespass (1) Whoever unlawfully enters the private premises, business premises or other enclosed property of another, or closed premises designated for public service or ...


11

Is "befriedet" correctly translated to "pacified" here? The word "befriedet" does not come from the word "Friede" but from the word "Einfriedung". A "Einfriedung" is any kind of structure that marks the border of some area not allowing people to enter - for example a fence, a wall or a hedge. So ...


25

„Befriedetes Besitztum“ has an additional special meaning in legalese. It is "a property or building that is secured against unauthorized entry in a recognizable manner by contiguous protective barriers by the authorized person." (Oberlandesgericht Frankfurt 2006) (...ein Grundstück bzw. Gebäude, „das von dem Berechtigten in äußerlich erkennbarer ...


8

The google translation got it wrong, this is not about conquest. In this case "befriedet" = "under legal protection". https://www.dwds.de/wb/befriedet This is a slight case of officialese, meaning the property is legally owned by somebody and refers to their right of ownership and to execute some authority, e.g. deny access. Edit: @guidot ...


0

If you talk about somebody for example: Der kriegt auch nichts auf die Reihe, it pretty much means: He is a looser.


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